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Favored child? School choice within the family

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  • Chumacero, Rómulo
  • Paredes, Ricardo

Abstract

We study school choice within the family, analyzing how birth order, gender, innate talent, and family financial restrictions impact the parents´ decision to prioritize the education of one or more of the children over the rest. We find that parents, particularly from lower income homes, are more likely to select more prestigious, higher cost schools for their eldest child, male children and the most talented children. This behavior may explain part of the positive “male bias” in learning and may have a relevant impact on income distribution among family members.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 31838.

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Date of creation: 25 Jun 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:31838

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Keywords: School Choice; Siblings; Chile;

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References

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  1. Luis Rubalcava & Dante Contreras, 2000. "Does Gender and Birth Order Matter when Parents Specialize in Child’s Nutrition? Evidence from Chile," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0, pages 353-386, November.
  2. Behrman, Jere R., 1988. "Nutrition, health, birth order and seasonality : Intrahousehold allocation among children in rural India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 43-62, February.
  3. Alison Booth & Hiau Kee, 2009. "Birth order matters: the effect of family size and birth order on educational attainment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 367-397, April.
  4. Francisco Gallego & Andrés E. Hernando., 2008. "On the Determinants and Implications of School Choice: Semi-Structural Simulations for Chile," Documentos de Trabajo 343, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  5. Mette Ejrnæs & Claus C. Pörtner, 2004. "Birth Order and the Intrahousehold Allocation of Time and Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(4), pages 1008-1019, November.
  6. Brownstone, David & Train, Kenneth, 1999. "Forecasting new product penetration with flexible substitution patterns," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3tb6j874, University of California Transportation Center.
  7. Ricardo Paredes & Juan Ignacio Pinto, 2009. "El fin de la educación pública en Chile?," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 36(1 Year 20), pages 47-66, June.
  8. Daniel G—mez & R—mulo A. Chumacero & Ricardo D. Paredes, 2012. "School choice and information," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 39(2 Year 20), pages 143-157, December.
  9. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "Does Competition among Public Schools Benefit Students and Taxpayers?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1209-1238, December.
  10. Theodore W. Schultz, 1960. "Capital Formation by Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 68, pages 571.
  11. Alderman, Harold & Orazem, Peter & Paterno, Elizabeth M., 2001. "School Quality, School Cost, and the Public/Private School Choices of Low-Income Households in Pakistan," Staff General Research Papers 1970, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  12. Chang-Tai Hsieh & Miguel Urquiola, 2003. "When Schools Compete, How Do They Compete? An Assessment of Chile's Nationwide School Voucher Program," NBER Working Papers 10008, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Paredes, Ricardo & Ugarte, Gabriel, 2009. "Should Students Be Allowed to Miss?," MPRA Paper 15583, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  14. Thomas, D., 1989. "Intra-Household Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach," Papers 586, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  15. Khanam, Rasheda, 2006. "Child labour and school attendance: evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 6990, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2007.
  16. Momi Dahan & Alejandro Gaviria, 1999. "Sibling Correlations and Social Mobility in Latin America," IDB Publications 6451, Inter-American Development Bank.
  17. Caroline Minter Hoxby, 1994. "Do Private Schools Provide Competition for Public Schools?," NBER Working Papers 4978, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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