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Dual Tracks: Part-time Work in Life-Cycle Employment for British Women

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  • Mary Gregory
  • Sara Connolly

Abstract

Almost half the women in work in the UK work part-time, but views conflict: does this support a woman`s career or is it a dead-end trap? Cohort data on labour market involvement to age 42 show highly varied pathways through full/part-time/non-employment. Econometric estimation confirms that individual characteristics matter, but labour market history is particularly powerful. Part-time work serves two different functions. A history of full-time work even including spells in part-time or non-employment, tends to lead back to full-time work, so supporting a career. Part-time work combined with non-employment is unlikely to lead to full-time work, and is a trap.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number 301.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2007
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:301

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Keywords: Female Employment; Part-time Work; Persistence; Life-cycle; Dynamic Panel; Discrete Choice;

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References

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  1. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2007. "Moving Down: Women`s Part-time Work and Occupational Change in Britain 1991-2001," Economics Series Working Papers 359, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Booth, Alison L & Jenkins, Stephen P & Serrano, Carlos Garcia, 1999. " New Men and New Women? A Comparison of Paid Work Propensities from a Panel Data Perspective," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(2), pages 167-97, May.
  3. Booth, A.L. & Ours, J.C. van, 2007. "Job Satisfaction And Family Happiness: The Part-Time Work Problem," Discussion Paper 2007-69, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  4. Jacqueline O'Reilly & Silke Bothfeld, 2002. "What happens after working part time? Integration, maintenance or exclusionary transitions in Britain and western Germany," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 409-439, July.
  5. Gianna Claudia Giannelli, 1996. "Women`s transitions in the labour market: A competing risks analysis on German panel data," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 287-300.
  6. Stewart, Mark, 2006. "The Inter-related Dynamics of Unemployment and Low-Wage Employment," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 741, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  7. AlisonL. Booth & JanC. vanOurs, 2008. "Job Satisfaction and Family Happiness: The Part-Time Work Puzzle," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages F77-F99, 02.
  8. Florence Jaumotte, 2003. "Labour Force Participation of Women: Empirical Evidence on The Role of Policy and Other Determinants in OECD Countries," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2003(2), pages 51-108.
  9. Dean R. Hyslop, 1999. "State Dependence, Serial Correlation and Heterogeneity in Intertemporal Labor Force Participation of Married Women," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1255-1294, November.
  10. Hakim, Catherine, 1998. "Social Change and Innovation in the Labour Market: Evidence from the Census SARs on Occupational Segregation and Labour Mobility, Part-Time Work and Students' Jobs, Homework and Self-Employment," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198293811, September.
  11. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & Mourre, Gilles & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 2005. "Part-Time Work in EU Countries: Labour Market Mobility, Entry and Exit," IZA Discussion Papers 1550, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Florence Jaumotte, 2003. "Female Labour Force Participation: Past Trends and Main Determinants in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 376, OECD Publishing.
  13. Narendranathan, W. & Elias, P., 1990. "Influences of Past History on the Incidence of Youth Unemployment: Empirical Finding for the U.K," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 369, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  14. Sara Connolly & Mary Gregory, 2009. "The part-time pay penalty: earnings trajectories of British Women," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(suppl_1), pages i76-i97, April.
  15. Gregg, Paul, 2001. "The Impact of Youth Unemployment on Adult Unemployment in the NCDS," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(475), pages F626-53, November.
  16. Kathryn Shaw, 1994. "The Persistence of Female Labor Supply: Empirical Evidence and Implications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 348-378.
  17. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2008. "Feature: The Price of Reconciliation: Part-Time Work, Families and Women's Satisfaction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages F1-F7, 02.
  18. Chamberlain, Gary, 1984. "Panel data," Handbook of Econometrics, in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 22, pages 1247-1318 Elsevier.
  19. Alan Manning & Barbara Petrongolo, 2008. "The Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages F28-F51, 02.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2007. "Part-time Employment Can Be a Life-time Setback for Earnings: A Study of British Women 1975-2001," Economics Series Working Papers 358, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Fernández-Kranz, Daniel & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria, 2009. "The Part-Time Pay Penalty in a Segmented Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 4342, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Helena Corrales Herrero & Beatriz Rodríguez Prado, 2011. "El empleo a tiempo parcial entre los jóvenes: Puente o trampa," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6, in: Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 42, pages 677-692 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
  4. David De Wachter & Karel Neels, 2011. "Educational differentials in fertility intentions and outcomes: family formation in Flanders in the early 1990s," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 9(1), pages 227-258.
  5. Garnero, Andrea & Kampelmann, Stephan & Rycx, Francois, 2013. "Part-time Work, Wages and Productivity: Evidence from Belgian Matched Panel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 7789, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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