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What happens after working part time? Integration, maintenance or exclusionary transitions in Britain and western Germany

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  • Jacqueline O'Reilly
  • Silke Bothfeld
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    Abstract

    We address the issues raised by G¸nther Schmid's proposal to develop transitional labour markets, by examining theoretical explanations and empirical evidence affecting transitions through part-time work. By analysing British and German Household Panel data, we outline the changing characteristics of part-time employment and employees in the early 1990s. We show that only a tiny number of women were able to use part-time work as a bridge back into a full-time job. A substantial proportion ends up dropping out of employment, especially in Germany. Having previous employment experience is more likely to hinder exclusionary transition patterns, whereas the presence of more than one child, especially in Germany, is associated with dropping out. We conclude by assessing the implication of these findings for both policy reform and theoretical developments. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 26 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 4 (July)
    Pages: 409-439

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:26:y:2002:i:4:p:409-439

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    Cited by:
    1. Sara Connolly & Mary Gregory, 2010. "Dual tracks: part-time work in life-cycle employment for British women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 907-931, June.
    2. Juan R. Cuadrado Roura & Carlos Iglesias Fernández & Raquel Llorente Heras, 2007. "Regional differences in women´s part time employment. An analysis of supply and demand," Working Papers 03/07, Instituto Universitario de Análisis Económico y Social.
    3. Joanna Osiñska, 2013. "Postawy wzglêdem euro i ich determinanty– przegl¹d badañ i literatury przedmiotu," Working Papers 70, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    4. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & Mourre, Gilles & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 2004. "The Determinants of Part-Time Work in EU Countries: Empirical Investigations with Macro-Panel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 1361, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Tony Fang & Fiona MacPhail, 2008. "Transitions from Temporary to Permanent Work in Canada: Who Makes the Transition and Why?," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 88(1), pages 51-74, August.
    6. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & Mourre, Gilles & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie, 2008. "Why do Europeans work part-time? A cross-country panel analysis," Working Paper Series 0872, European Central Bank.
    7. Ragni Hege Kitterød & Marit Rønsen & AneSeierstad, 2011. "Mobilising female labour market reserves: What promotes women’s transitions from part-time to full-time work?," Discussion Papers 658, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
    8. Ragni Hege Kitterød & Marit Rønsen & Ane Seierstad, 2011. "Working hours in dual-earner couples: Does one partner work less when the other works more?," Discussion Papers 670, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
    9. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2005. "Part-time Work - A Trap for Women`s Careers? An Analysis of the Roles of Heterogeneity and State Dependence," Economics Series Working Papers 245, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    10. Sylvie Morel, 2012. "Sécurisation des trajectoires professionnelles, institutionnalisme commonsien et marchés transitionnels," Post-Print halshs-00815518, HAL.
    11. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00484577 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Destefanis, Sergio & Mastromatteo, Giuseppe, 2010. "Wage Inequality and Labour-market Performance. A Role for Corporate Social Responsibility - Disuguaglianza salariale e performance del mercato del lavoro," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio di Genova, vol. 63(1), pages 91-120.
    13. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & Mourre, Gilles & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 2004. "Recent Developments in Part-Time Work in EU-15 Countries: Trends and Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 1415, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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