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Remanufacturing

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  • Sophie Bernard

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON)

Abstract

Remanufacturing is a form of recycling where used durable goods are refurbished to a condition comparable to new products. With reduced energy and resource consumption, remanufactured goods are produced at a fraction of the original cost and with lower emissions of pollution. This paper presents a theoretical model of remanufacturing where a duopoly of original manufacturers produce a component of a final good. The component needing to be replaced creates an aftermarket. An environmental regulation assessing a minimum level of remanufacturability is also introduced. The main results indicate that a social planner could use collusion of the firms on the level of remanufacturability as a substitute for environmental regulation. However, if an environmental regulation is to be implemented, collusion should be repressed since competition supports the public intervention better. One of the results also coincides with the Porter Hypothesis.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Ottawa, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1003E.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ott:wpaper:1003e

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Keywords: remanufacturing; competition; environmental regulation; Porter Hypothesis;

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  1. Michael Waldman, 2010. "Competition, Monopoly, and Aftermarkets," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(1), pages 54-91, April.
  2. Bernard Sinclair-Desgagné & Maia David, 2005. "Environmental Regulationand the Eco-Industry," Working Papers 2005.56, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  3. Fullerton, Don & Wu, Wenbo, 1998. "Policies for Green Design," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 131-148, September.
  4. Lebreton, Baptiste & Tuma, Axel, 2006. "A quantitative approach to assessing the profitability of car and truck tire remanufacturing," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 639-652, December.
  5. Thomas Eichner & Marco Runkel, 2005. "Efficient Policies for Green Design in a Vintage Durable Good Model," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 30(3), pages 259-278, 03.
  6. van der Laan, E.A. & Kiesmueller, G.P., 2001. "An Inventory Model with Dependent Product Demands and Returns," ERIM Report Series Research in Management, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasm ERS-2001-16-LIS, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
  7. Mitra, Supriya & Webster, Scott, 2008. "Competition in remanufacturing and the effects of government subsidies," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(2), pages 287-298, February.
  8. Francisco J. André & Paula González & Nicolás Porteiro, 2007. "Strategic Quality Competition and the Porter Hypothesis," Working Papers 07.03, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
  9. Heese, Hans S. & Cattani, Kyle & Ferrer, Geraldo & Gilland, Wendell & Roth, Aleda V., 2005. "Competitive advantage through take-back of used products," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 164(1), pages 143-157, July.
  10. Geraldo Ferrer & Jayashankar M. Swaminathan, 2006. "Managing New and Remanufactured Products," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(1), pages 15-26, January.
  11. Klemperer, Paul, 1995. "Competition When Consumers Have Switching Costs: An Overview with Applications to Industrial Organization, Macroeconomics, and International Trade," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 515-39, October.
  12. Chung, Chun-Jen & Wee, Hui-Ming, 2008. "Green-component life-cycle value on design and reverse manufacturing in semi-closed supply chain," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(2), pages 528-545, June.
  13. Eichner, Thomas & Pethig, Rudiger, 2001. "Product Design and Efficient Management of Recycling and Waste Treatment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 109-134, January.
  14. Giutini, Ron & Gaudette, Kevin, 2003. "Remanufacturing: The next great opportunity for boosting US productivity," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 46(6), pages 41-48.
  15. Laurens G. Debo & L. Beril Toktay & Luk N. Van Wassenhove, 2005. "Market Segmentation and Product Technology Selection for Remanufacturable Products," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 51(8), pages 1193-1205, August.
  16. Canton, Joan, 2008. "Redealing the cards: How an eco-industry modifies the political economy of environmental taxes," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 295-315, August.
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