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Productivity in New Zealand 1988 to 2002

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Author Info

  • Melleny Black

    ()

  • Melody Guy

    ()

  • Nathan McLellan

    ()
    (The Treasury)

Abstract

This paper reports new aggregate and industry productivity series for the New Zealand economy for the period 1988 to 2002. These productivity series are intended for ongoing monitoring of New Zealand’s productivity performance and for use in further analyses investigating the evolution, sources and determinants of New Zealand’s productivity growth. Productivity series are constructed using index number techniques and industry data sourced from Statistics New Zealand. Throughout, comparisons are made with the productivity estimates reported in Diewert and Lawrence’s (1999), Measuring New Zealand’s Productivity. Industry data are also used to construct productivity series that are comparable with the market sector productivity series published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The comparison between Australia and New Zealand shows that market sector multifactor productivity has been similar in both countries over the full sample period. Since 1994 average labour productivity growth has been higher in Australia, which reflects the relatively lower rate of physical capital accumulation in New Zealand after 1993. On the other hand, New Zealand’s capital productivity growth has been higher than Australia’s capital productivity growth since 1994, reflecting the relatively higher growth in hours worked in New Zealand.

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File URL: http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/research-policy/wp/2003/03-06/twp03-06.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by New Zealand Treasury in its series Treasury Working Paper Series with number 03/06.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:03/06

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Postal: New Zealand Treasury, PO Box 3724, Wellington, New Zealand
Phone: +64-4-472 2733
Fax: +64-4-473 0982
Web page: http://www.treasury.govt.nz
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Keywords: Economic growth; productivity measurement; index numbers; Australia and New Zealand comparison;

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References

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  1. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 2002. "It's Not Factor Accumulation: Stylized Facts and Growth Models," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 164, Central Bank of Chile.
  2. W A Razzak, 2004. "Towards Building A New Consensus About New Zealand’s Productivity," GE, Growth, Math methods 0405002, EconWPA.
  3. Nathan McLellan, 2004. "Measuring Productivity using the Index Number Approach: An Introduction," Treasury Working Paper Series 04/05, New Zealand Treasury.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Paul Schreyer, 2007. "International Comparisons of Levels of Capital Input and Multi-Factor Productivity," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 8, pages 237-254, 05.
  2. Edda Claus & Iris Claus, 2005. "New Zealand'S Economic Reforms And Changing Production Structure," CAMA Working Papers 2005-16, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  3. Hazledine, Tim & Quiggin, John, 2005. "No more free beer tomorrow? Economic policy and outcomes in Australia and New Zealand 1984-2003," Risk and Sustainable Management Group Working Papers 151509, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
  4. Arthur Grimes, 2004. "New Zealand: A Typical Australasian Ecomony?," Working Papers 04_11, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  5. Thijs Raa & Victoria Shestalova, 2011. "The Solow residual, Domar aggregation, and inefficiency: a synthesis of TFP measures," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 71-77, August.
  6. Julie Fry, 2014. "Migration and Macroeconomic Performance in New Zealand: Theory and Evidence," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/10, New Zealand Treasury.
  7. Cao, Kay & Forbes, Rod, 2007. "Productivity in the New Zealand Primary and Downstream Sectors," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 15.
  8. Engelbrecht, Hans-Jurgen & Xayavong, Vilaphonh, 2006. "ICT intensity and New Zealand's productivity malaise: Is the glass half empty or half full?," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 24-42, March.
  9. Engelbrecht, Hans-Jurgen & Xayavong, Vilaphonh, 2004. "Information And Communication Technology And New Zealand'S Productivity Malaise: An Industry-Level Study," Discussion Papers 23698, Massey University, Department of Applied and International Economics.
  10. Peter Mawson & Kenneth I Carlaw & Nathan McLellan, 2003. "Productivity Measurement: Alternative Approaches and Estimates," Treasury Working Paper Series 03/12, New Zealand Treasury.

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