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Productivity in New Zealand 1988 to 2002

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  • Melleny Black
  • Melody Guy
  • Nathan McLellan

Abstract

This paper reports new aggregate and industry productivity series for the New Zealand economy for the period 1988 to 2002. Comparison between Australia and New Zealand shows that market sector multifactor productivity growth has been similar in both countries over the full sample period. Since 1994 average labour productivity growth has been higher in Australia, which reflects the relatively lower rate of physical capital accumulation in New Zealand after 1993. On the other hand, New Zealand's capital productivity growth has been higher than Australia's capital productivity growth since 1994, reflecting the relatively higher growth in hours worked in New Zealand.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00779950309544381
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal New Zealand Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 37 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 119-150

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Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:37:y:2003:i:1:p:119-150

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References

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  1. Nathan McLellan, 2004. "Measuring Productivity using the Index Number Approach: An Introduction," Treasury Working Paper Series 04/05, New Zealand Treasury.
  2. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 2002. "It's Not Factor Accumulation: Stylized Facts and Growth Models," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 164, Central Bank of Chile.
  3. W A Razzak, 2004. "Towards Building A New Consensus About New Zealand’s Productivity," GE, Growth, Math methods 0405002, EconWPA.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Cao, Kay & Forbes, Rod, 2007. "Productivity in the New Zealand Primary and Downstream Sectors," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 15.
  2. Tim Hazledine & John Quiggin, 2005. "No More Free Beer Tomorrow? Economic policy and outcomes in Australia and New Zealand 1984-2003," Australian Public Policy Program Working Papers WP4P05, Risk and Sustainable Management Group, University of Queensland.
  3. Peter Mawson & Kenneth I Carlaw & Nathan McLellan, 2003. "Productivity Measurement: Alternative Approaches and Estimates," Treasury Working Paper Series 03/12, New Zealand Treasury.
  4. Julie Fry, 2014. "Migration and Macroeconomic Performance in New Zealand: Theory and Evidence," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/10, New Zealand Treasury.
  5. Engelbrecht, Hans-Jurgen & Xayavong, Vilaphonh, 2004. "Information And Communication Technology And New Zealand'S Productivity Malaise: An Industry-Level Study," Discussion Papers 23698, Massey University, Department of Applied and International Economics.
  6. Thijs Raa & Victoria Shestalova, 2011. "The Solow residual, Domar aggregation, and inefficiency: a synthesis of TFP measures," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 71-77, August.
  7. Engelbrecht, Hans-Jurgen & Xayavong, Vilaphonh, 2006. "ICT intensity and New Zealand's productivity malaise: Is the glass half empty or half full?," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 24-42, March.
  8. Arthur Grimes, 2005. "New Zealand: A Typical Australasian Economy?," Economic History 0509004, EconWPA.
  9. Edda Claus & Iris Claus, 2005. "New Zealand'S Economic Reforms And Changing Production Structure," CAMA Working Papers 2005-16, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  10. Paul Schreyer, 2007. "International Comparisons of Levels of Capital Input and Multi-Factor Productivity," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 8, pages 237-254, 05.

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