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Household Demand for Low Carbon Public Policies: Evidence from California

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  • Matthew J. Holian
  • Matthew E. Kahn

Abstract

In recent years, Californians have voted on two key pieces of low carbon regulation. The resulting voting patterns provide an opportunity to examine the demand for carbon mitigation efforts. Household voting patterns are found to mirror the voting patterns by the U.S Congress on national carbon legislation. Political liberals and more educated voters favor such regulations while suburbanites tend to oppose such initiatives. Survey responses at the individual level are shown to predict the spatial variation in actual voting patterns and hence convergent validity for results obtained with stated preference data on voting markets.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19965.

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Date of creation: Mar 2014
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19965

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References

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  1. Bjorn Harsman & John Quigley, 2011. "Political and Public Acceptability of Congestion Pricing: Ideology and Self Interest," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1477, European Regional Science Association.
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  3. Matthew J. Holian & Matthew E. Kahn, 2013. "The Rise of the Low Carbon Consumer City," NBER Working Papers 18735, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  8. Kahn, Matthew E & Matsusaka, John G, 1997. "Demand for Environmental Goods: Evidence from Voting Patterns on California Initiatives," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(1), pages 137-73, April.
  9. Michael I. Cragg & Matthew E. Kahn, 2009. "Carbon Geography: The Political Economy of Congressional Support for Legislation Intended to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Production," NBER Working Papers 14963, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Erzo F.P. Luttmer, 1999. "Group Loyalty and the Taste for Redistribution," JCPR Working Papers 61, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
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  12. Peltzman, Sam, 1984. "Constituent Interest and Congressional Voting," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 181-210, April.
  13. Martin L. Weitzman, 2009. "On Modeling and Interpreting the Economics of Catastrophic Climate Change," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(1), pages 1-19, February.
  14. John G. Matsusaka, 2005. "Direct Democracy Works," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(2), pages 185-206, Spring.
  15. Deacon, Robert T & Shapiro, Perry, 1975. "Private Preference for Collective Goods Revealed Through Voting on Referenda," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(5), pages 943-55, December.
  16. LeRoy, Stephen F. & Sonstelie, Jon, 1983. "Paradise lost and regained: Transportation innovation, income, and residential location," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 67-89, January.
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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. My Three New NBER Papers
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-03-12 13:11:00
  2. Three New Economics Papers Related to Mitigating Climate Change
    by Matthew E. Kahn in The Reality-Based Community on 2014-03-12 16:20:17
  3. Suburbanites Vote Against Carbon Pricing
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-04-05 18:40:00
  4. Could Climate Change Mitigation Be An Important Issue in the 2016 Election?
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-05-22 15:01:00
  5. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Becker's Household Production Theory
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-06-05 16:08:00
  6. Krugman on Carbon Mitigation, Self Interest and Ideology
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-06-09 17:37:00
  7. Some Comments on Robert Rubin's "Risky Business"
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-07-26 22:43:00
  8. The Consequences of Ideology
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-08-13 15:18:00

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