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  • Gabriella Conti
  • Andrea Galeotti
  • Gerrit Mueller
  • Stephen Pudney

Abstract

What makes you popular at school? And what are the labor market returns to popularity? We investigate these questions using an objective measure of popularity derived from sociometric theory: the number of friendship nominations received from schoolmates, interpreted as a measure of early accumulation of personal social capital. We develop an econometric model of friendship formation and labor market outcomes allowing for partial observation of networks, and provide new evidence on the impact of early family environment on popularity. We estimate that moving from the 20th to 80th percentile of the high-school popularity distribution yields a 10% wage premium nearly 40 years later.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18475.

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Date of creation: Oct 2012
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Publication status: published as Gabriella Conti & Andrea Galeotti & Gerrit Müller & Stephen Pudney, 2013. "Popularity," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(4), pages 1072-1094.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18475

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  1. David Johnston & Propper, Carol & Pudney, Stephen & Shields, Michael, 2011. "Child mental health and educational attainment: multiple observers and the measurement error problem," ISER Working Paper Series 2011-20, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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  1. Money, reputation and happiness
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2009-03-05 17:27:55

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