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Corporate Taxes and Union Wages in the United States

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  • R. Alison Felix
  • James R. Hines, Jr.

Abstract

This paper evaluates the effect of U.S. state corporate income taxes on union wages. American workers who belong to unions are paid more than their non-union counterparts, and this difference is greater in low-tax locations, reflecting that unions and employers share tax savings associated with low tax rates. In 2000 the difference between average union and non-union hourly wages was $1.88 greater in states with corporate tax rates below four percent than in states with tax rates of nine percent and above. Controlling for observable worker characteristics, a one percent lower state tax rate is associated with a 0.36 percent higher union wage premium, suggesting that workers in a fully unionized firm capture roughly 54 percent of the benefits of low tax rates.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 15263.

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Date of creation: Aug 2009
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15263

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  1. Wiji Arulampalam & Michael P Devereux & Giorgia Maffini, 2007. "The Direct Incidence of Corporate Income Tax on Wages," Working Papers 0707, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
  2. John W. Budd & Matthew J.Slaughter, 2000. "Are Profits Shared Across Borders? Evidence on International Rent Sharing," NBER Working Papers 8014, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. John M. Abowd & Thomas Lemieux, 1991. "The Effects of Product Market Competition on Collective Bargaining Agreements: The Case of Foreign Competition in Canada," NBER Working Papers 3808, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Bernt Bratsberg & James F. Ragan & Jr, 2002. "Changes in the union wage premium by industry," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(1), pages 65-83, October.
  5. John W. Budd & Jozef Konings & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2002. "Wages and International Rent Sharing in Multinational Firms," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 522, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  6. Anand, Bharat N. & Sansing, Richard, 2000. "The Weighting Game: Formula Apportionment as an Instrument of Public Policy," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 53(n. 2), pages 183-200, June.
  7. Blanchflower, David G & Oswald, Andrew J & Sanfey, Peter, 1996. "Wages, Profits, and Rent-Sharing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 111(1), pages 227-51, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Arulampalam, Wiji & Devereux, Michael P. & Maffini, Giorgia, 2012. "The direct incidence of corporate income tax on wages," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 1038-1054.
  2. Clemens Fuest & Andreas Peichl & Sebastian Siegloch, 2012. "Which Workers Bear the Burden of Corporate Taxation and Which Firms Can Pass It On? Micro Evidence from Germany," Working Papers 1216, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
  3. Jennifer C. Gravelle, 2011. "Corporate Tax Incidence: A Review of Empirical Estimates and Analysis: Working Paper 2011-01," Working Papers 41511, Congressional Budget Office.
  4. Fuest, Clemens & Peichl, Andreas & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2013. "Do higher corporate taxes reduce wages? Micro evidence from Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-039, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  5. Timothy J. Goodspeed, 2012. "The Incidence of Bank Regulations and Taxes on Wages: Evidence from US States," CESifo Working Paper Series 4026, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Sebastian Krautheim & Tim Schmidt-Eisenlohr, 2011. "Wages and International Tax Competition," Working Papers 1123, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
  7. Li Liu & Rosanne Altshuler, 2011. "Measuring the burden of the corporate income tax under imperfect competition," Working Papers 1105, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
  8. Mittermaier, Ferdinand & Rincke, Johannes, 2013. "Do countries compensate firms for international wage differentials?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 23-36.
  9. Peichl, Andreas & Fuest, Clemens & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2013. "Wage Incidence of Local Corporate Taxation - Micro Evidence from Germany," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79916, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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