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The Impact of Poor Health on Education: New Evidence Using Genetic Markers

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  • Weili Ding
  • Steven F. Lehrer
  • J. Niels Rosenquist
  • Janet Audrain-McGovern

Abstract

This paper examines the influence of health conditions on academic performance during adolescence. To account for the endogeneity of health outcomes and their interactions with risky behaviors we exploit natural variation within a set of genetic markers across individuals. We present strong evidence that these genetic markers serve as valid instruments with good statistical properties for ADHD, depression and obesity. They help to reveal a new dynamism from poor health to lower academic achievement with substantial heterogeneity in their impacts across genders. Our investigation further exposes the considerable challenges in identifying health impacts due to the prevalence of comorbid health conditions and endogenous health behaviors.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12304.

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Date of creation: Jun 2006
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Publication status: published as Ding, W., S. Lehrer, N. Rosenquist and J. Audrain-McGovern. "The Impact of Poor Health on Academic Performance: New Evidence Using Genetic Markers." Journal of Health Economics 28, 3 (May 2009): 578-597.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12304

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