Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

What Do Wage Differentials Tell Us about Labor Market Discrimination?

Contents:

Author Info

  • June E. O'Neill
  • Dave M. O'Neill

Abstract

We examine the extent to which non-discriminatory factors can explain observed wage gaps between racial and ethnic minorities and whites, and between women and men. In general we find that differences in productivity-related factors account for most of the between group wage differences in the year 2000. Determinants of wage gaps differ by group. Differences in schooling and in skills developed in the home and in school, as measured by test scores, are of central importance in explaining black/white and Hispanic/white wage gaps among both women and men. Immigrant assimilation is an additional factor for Asians and workers from Central and South America. The sources of the gender gap are quite different, however. Gender differences in schooling and cognitive skills as measured by the AFQT are quite small and explain little of the pay gap. Instead the gender gap largely stems from choices made by women and men concerning the amount of time and energy devoted to a career, as reflected in years of work experience, utilization of part-time work, and other workplace and job characteristics.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w11240.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 11240.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Apr 2005
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as O'Neill, June, and Dave O'Neill. 2006 "What Do Wage Differentials Tell Us about Labor Market Discrimination?" In The Economics of Immigration and Social Policy, edited by Soloman Polachek, Carmel Chiswich, and Hillel Rapoport. Research in Labor Economics 24:293-357.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11240

Note: LS
Contact details of provider:
Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Phone: 617-868-3900
Email:
Web page: http://www.nber.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Jane Waldfogel, 1998. "Understanding the "Family Gap" in Pay for Women with Children," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 137-156, Winter.
  2. Sanders Korenman & David Neumark, 1991. "Does Marriage Really Make Men More Productive?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 282-307.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Houseworth, Christina & Fisher, Jonathan, 2011. "The Reverse Wage Gap among Educated White and Black Women," MPRA Paper 35827, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Yoram Weiss & Murat Iyigun & Yoram Weiss, 2006. "Investment in Schooling and the Marriage Market," 2006 Meeting Papers, Society for Economic Dynamics 43, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Francesco Renna & Randall King, 2007. "The Impact of Racial Discrimination on the Early Career Outcomes of Young Men," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 35(3), pages 269-278, September.
  4. Peter McHenry & Melissa McInerney, 2012. "Are Wage Premiums for Black Women Illusory? A Critical Examination," Working Papers, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary 120, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  5. Hélène Perivier, 2007. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis - Une mise en perspective avec la France et la Suède," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE) 2007-07, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  6. David Bravo & Claudia Sanhueza & Sergio Urzua, 2008. "Discriminación en el mercado laboral entre profesionales de Chile. Abogados, Médicos y gente de negocios," Research Department Publications, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department 3249, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  7. Olaf Hübler & Lukas Menkhoff, 2011. "Do Women Manage Smaller Funds?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 58(1), pages 107-126, February.
  8. David Bravo Urrutia & Sergio Urzúa & Claudia Sanhueza, 2007. "Is There Labor Market Discrimination Among Professionals In Chile? Lawyers, Doctors And Business-People," Working Papers, University of Chile, Department of Economics wp264, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  9. Chad R. Wilkerson & Megan D. Williams, 2006. "Minority workers in the Tenth District: rising presence, rising challenges," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q IV, pages 31-59.
  10. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE) 2008-12, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  11. Huber, Martin, 2014. "Causal pitfalls in the decomposition of wage gaps," Economics Working Paper Series 1405, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11240. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.