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The Reverse Wage Gap among Educated White and Black Women

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  • Houseworth, Christina
  • Fisher, Jonathan

Abstract

Using the 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses and the 2004-2005 American Community Surveys, we estimate the black-white wage gap among females with at least some college education. We find that black female nurses earn 9 percent more at the mean and median than white female nurses, controlling for selection into nursing employment. Among K-12 teachers, black females earn 7 percent more than white females at the median. There is no black-white wage gap among all women with a bachelor’s degree. Differences in opportunities for education and marriage between white and black women may explain why highly educated black females earn on par with highly educated white females.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 35827.

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Date of creation: 20 Jan 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:35827

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Keywords: Human capital; differential demand and supply for schooling; wage gaps;

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  1. Neal, Derek A & Johnson, William R, 1996. "The Role of Premarket Factors in Black-White Wage Differences," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(5), pages 869-95, October.
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  5. Dan A. Black & Amelia M. Haviland & Seth G. Sanders & Lowell J. Taylor, 2008. "Gender Wage Disparities among the Highly Educated," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 630-659.
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  7. Christopher R. Bollinger, 2003. "Measurement Error in Human Capital and the Black-White Wage Gap," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 578-585, August.
  8. Sandra E. Black & Amir Sufi, 2002. "Who Goes to College? Differential Enrollment by Race and Family Background," NBER Working Papers 9310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  14. Dan Black & Amelia Haviland & Seth Sanders & Lowell Taylor, 2006. "Why Do Minority Men Earn Less? A Study of Wage Differentials among the Highly Educated," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 300-313, May.
  15. Aaron Gullickson, 2006. "Education and black-white interracial marriage," Demography, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 673-689, November.
  16. Chiswick, Barry R, 1988. "Differences in Education and Earnings across Racial and Ethnic Groups: Tastes, Discrimination, and Investments in Child Quality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 103(3), pages 571-97, August.
  17. Sergio Urzúa, 2008. "Racial Labor Market Gaps: The Role of Abilities and Schooling Choices," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
  18. Ronald Caldwell Jr., 2008. "The Effects of University Affirmative Action Policies on the Human Capital Development of Minority Children: Do Expectations Matter?," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 200812, University of Kansas, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2010.
  19. Deborah Anderson & David Shapiro, 1996. "Racial differences in access to high-paying jobs and the wage gap between black and white women," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(2), pages 273-286, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Peter McHenry & Melissa McInerney, 2012. "Are Wage Premiums for Black Women Illusory? A Critical Examination," Working Papers 120, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  2. Jonathan Fisher & Christina Houseworth, 2012. "Occupation Inflation in the Current Population Survey," Working Papers 12-26, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

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