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Long-Term Consequences of Secondary School Vouchers: Evidence from Administrative Records in Colombia

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  • Joshua Angrist
  • Eric Bettinger
  • Michael Kremer

Abstract

Colombia's PACES program provided over 125,000 poor children with vouchers that covered half the cost of private secondary school. The vouchers were renewable annually conditional on adequate academic progress. Since many vouchers were assigned by lottery, program effects can reliably be assessed by comparing lottery winners and losers. Estimates using administrative records suggest the PACES program increased secondary school completion rates by 15-20 percent. Correcting for the greater percentage of lottery winners taking college admissions tests, the program increased test scores by two-tenths of a standard deviation in the distribution of potential test scores. Boys, who have lower scores than girls in this population, show larger test score gains, especially in math.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 10713.

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Date of creation: Aug 2004
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Publication status: published as Angrist, Joshua, Eric Bettinger and Michael Kremer. "Long-Term Educational Consequences Of Secondary School Vouchers: Evidence From Administrative Records In Colombia," American Economic Review, 2006, v96(3,Jun), 847-862.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10713

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  1. Kremer, Michael & Miguel, Edward & Thornton, Rebecca & Ozier, Owen, 2005. "Incentives to learn," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3546, The World Bank.
  2. Laurent Calvet & Adlai Fisher, 2003. "Regime-Switching and the Estimation of Multifractal Processes," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research 1999, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  3. Angrist, J.D., 1996. "Conditional Independance in Sample Selection Models," Working papers, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics 96-27, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  4. Alan Krueger & Pei Zhu, 2002. "Another Look at the New York City School Voucher Experiment," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. 849, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  5. Dynarski, Susan, 2002. "The Consequences of Merit Aid," Working Paper Series, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government rwp02-051, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  6. David S. Lee, 2002. "Trimming for Bounds on Treatment Effects with Missing Outcomes," NBER Technical Working Papers 0277, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Cecilia Elena Rouse, 1998. "Private School Vouchers And Student Achievement: An Evaluation Of The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 113(2), pages 553-602, May.
  8. Christopher M. Cornwell & David B. Mustard & Deepa Sridhar, 2005. "The Enrollment Effects of Merit-Based Financial Aid: Evidence from Georgia's HOPE Scholarship," HEW, EconWPA 0501002, EconWPA.
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Brian Hayes on Irish Education Policy
    by Martin Ryan in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2010-11-08 16:52:00
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Cited by:
  1. Baez, Javier E. & Camacho, Adriana, 2011. "Assessing the long-term effects of conditional cash transfers on human capital : evidence from Colombia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5681, The World Bank.
  2. Bourdon, Jean & Frölich, Markus & Michaelowa, Katharina, 2007. "Teacher Shortages, Teacher Contracts and their Impact on Education in Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 2844, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Michael Lechner & Blaise Melly, 2010. "Partial Idendification of Wage Effects of Training Programs," Working Papers 2010-8, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  4. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Michael Kremer, 2006. "Long-Term Educational Consequences of Secondary School Vouchers: Evidence from Administrative Records in Colombia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 847-862, June.
  5. Michael Lechner & Blaise Melly, 2007. "Earnings Effects of Training Programs," University of St. Gallen Department of Economics working paper series 2007, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen 2007-28, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen.
  6. Victor Lavy, 2006. "From Forced Busing to Free Choice in Public Schools: Quasi-Experimental Evidence of Individual and General Effects," NBER Working Papers 11969, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. César P. Bouillon & Luis Tejerina, 2006. "Do We Know What Works?: A Systematic Review of Impact Evaluations of Social Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean," IDB Publications 80443, Inter-American Development Bank.
  8. Levitt, Steven D. & List, John A., 2009. "Field experiments in economics: The past, the present, and the future," European Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-18, January.
  9. Richard B. Freeman, 2006. "Learning from Other Economies: The Unique Institutional and Policy Experiments Down Under," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(257), pages 195-206, 06.
  10. Derek Neal, 2011. "The Design of Performance Pay in Education," NBER Working Papers 16710, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Elizabeth M. King & Jere R. Behrman, 2009. "Timing and Duration of Exposure in Evaluations of Social Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 24(1), pages 55-82, February.

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