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Central Mandates and Local Incentives: The Colombia Education Voucher Program

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  • King, Elizabeth M
  • Orazem, Peter F
  • Wohlgemuth, Darin

Abstract

In decentralized education systems programs that promote central mandates may have to be devolved to local governments, communities, and providers. When participation by local governments and providers is voluntary rather than compulsory, the determinants of program placement are important in predicting potential benefits to individuals. This article analyzes incentives for municipalities and private schools to participate in Colombia's voucher program. It finds that the demand for secondary education relative to the capacity of public schools and the availability of spaces in private schools in the municipality were key predictors of municipal participation, whereas the number of underserved students had a nonlinear effect on participation. Schools whose educational quality was moderate and charged moderate tuition fees were the most likely to participate; the program was less attractive to schools whose quality and fees were high and to schools whose quality and fees were low. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by World Bank Group in its journal World Bank Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 13 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 467-91

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Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:13:y:1999:i:3:p:467-91

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Cited by:
  1. Pablo González & Alejandra Mizala & Pilar Romaguera, 2002. "Recursos diferenciados a la educación subvencionada en Chile," Documentos de Trabajo 150, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  2. Jean Bourdon & Markus Frölich & Katharina Michaelowa, 2007. "Teacher Shortages, Teacher Contracts and their Impacton Education in Africa," Post-Print halshs-00150147, HAL.
  3. Elizabeth M. King & Jere R. Behrman, 2009. "Timing and Duration of Exposure in Evaluations of Social Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 24(1), pages 55-82, February.
  4. Orazem, Peter & King, Elizabeth M., 2008. "Schooling in Developing Countries: The Roles of Supply, Demand and Government Policy," Staff General Research Papers 12838, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  5. Khandker, Shahidur & Pitt, Mark & Fuwa, Nobuhiko, 2003. "Subsidy to Promote Girls' Secondary Education: The Female Stipend Program in Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 23688, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Wößmann, Ludger, 2010. "Families, schools and primary-school learning: Evidence for Argentina and Colombia in an international perspective," Munich Reprints in Economics 19682, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  7. Argentino Pessoa, 2008. "Educational Reform in Developing Countries: Private Involvement and Partnerships," FEP Working Papers 284, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  8. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Erik Bloom & Elizabeth King & Michael Kremer, 2001. "Vouchers for Private Schooling in Colombia: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment," NBER Working Papers 8343, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Michael Kremer, 2006. "Long-Term Educational Consequences of Secondary School Vouchers: Evidence from Administrative Records in Colombia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 847-862, June.
  10. World Bank, 2008. "Colombia - The Quality of Education in Colombia : An Analysis and Options for a Policy Agenda," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7875, The World Bank.
  11. Gauri, Varun & Vawda, Ayesha, 2003. "Vouchers for basic education in developing countries : a principal-agent perspective," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3005, The World Bank.
  12. Orazem, Peter & Glewwe, Paul & Patrinos, Harry, 2007. "The Benefits and Costs of Alternative Strategies to Improve Educational Outcomes," Staff General Research Papers 12853, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  13. Gunnarsson, Victoria & Orazem, Peter & Sanchez, Mario A. & Verdisco, Aimee, 2009. "Does Local School Control Raise Student Outcomes?: Evidence on the Roles of School Autonomy and Parental Participation," Staff General Research Papers 13083, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  14. Ariel Fiszbein, 2005. "Citizens, Politicians, and Providers : The Latin American Experience with Service Delivery Reform," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7371, August.

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