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Homeownership, Social Capital and Parental Voice in Schooling

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  • Arthur Grimes

    ()
    (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research; University of Waikato)

  • Steven Stillman

    ()
    (University of Otago; Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

  • Chris Young

    ()
    (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

Abstract

We investigate the effects of homeownership on parents? involvement in local school elections. We use 2007 New Zealand school board of trustees data to examine whether schools where parents have high rates of homeownership experience high parental voting turnout in elections. We also investigate whether homeownership influences the probability that a school board proceeds to election, indicating parental willingness to serve as a school trustee. Similarly, we examine whether state-owned social housing rates affect these outcomes. We compile results initially without controlling for other factors, and then controlling for a wide range of other characteristics, to test the robustness of simple observed associations between homeownership and state-ownership rates and outcome variables. Our findings show no discernible effect of homeownership on parental voting turnout in school elections after controls are added (contrary to the simple positive association), but a (robust) positive impact of both homeownership and state-ownership rates on the probability that a school holds an election.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Motu Economic and Public Policy Research in its series Working Papers with number 11_11.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:11_11

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Keywords: Homeownership; school elections; parental voice; social capital;

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  1. Engelhardt, Gary V. & Eriksen, Michael D. & Gale, William G. & Mills, Gregory B., 2010. "What are the social benefits of homeownership? Experimental evidence for low-income households," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 249-258, May.
  2. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
  3. Matthew Roskruge & Arthur Grimes & Philip McCann & Jacques Poot, 2011. "Homeownership and Social Capital in New Zealand," Working Papers 11_02, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
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