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Ode To The Sea: Workplace Organizations And Norms Of Cooperation

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  • Uri Gneezy
  • Andreas Leibbrandt
  • John A. List

Abstract

The functioning and well-being of any society and organization critically hinges on norms of cooperation that regulate social activities. Empirical evidence on how such norms emerge and in which environments they thrive remain a clear void in the literature. To provide an initial set of insights, we overlay a set of field experiments on a natural setting. Our approach is to compare behavior in Brazilian fishermen societies that differ only along one major dimension: the workplace organization. In one society (located by the sea) fishermen are forced to work in groups whereas in the adjacent society (located on a lake) fishing is inherently an individual activity. We report sharp evidence that the sea fishermen trust and cooperate more and have greater ability to coordinate group actions than their lake fishermen counterparts. These findings are consistent with the argument that people internalize social norms that emerge from specific needs and support the idea that socio-ecological factors play a decisive role in the proliferation of pro-social behaviors.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Monash University, Department of Economics in its series Monash Economics Working Papers with number 59-13.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2013-59

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Keywords: social norm; pro-sociality; field experiment;

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