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Occupational Status and Health Transitions

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Author Info

  • Morefield, G. Brant

    ()
    (University of North Carolina, Greensboro)

  • Ribar, David C.

    ()
    (University of Melbourne)

  • Ruhm, Christopher J.

    ()
    (University of Virginia)

Abstract

We use longitudinal data from the 1984 through 2007 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine how occupational status is related to the health transitions of 30 to 59 year-old U.S. males. A recent history of blue-collar employment predicts a substantial increase in the probability of transitioning from very good into bad self-assessed health, relative to white-collar employment, but with no evidence of occupational differences in movements from bad to very good health. These findings are robust to a series of sensitivity analyses. The results suggest that blue-collar workers "wear out" faster with age because they are more likely, than their white-collar counterparts, to experience negative health shocks. This partly reflects differences in the physical demands of blue-collar and white-collar jobs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5482.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy: Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy 11(3), 2011, Article 8, 2011, 1-27
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5482

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Keywords: physical demands; occupations; health;

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References

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  1. Jason M. Fletcher & Jody L. Sindelar, 2009. "Estimating Causal Effects of Early Occupational Choice on Later Health: Evidence Using the PSID," NBER Working Papers 15256, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Ai, Chunrong & Norton, Edward C., 2003. "Interaction terms in logit and probit models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 123-129, July.
  3. Eugene Choo & Michael Denny, 2006. "Wearing Out -- The Decline in Health," Working Papers tecipa-258, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Maclean, Johanna Catherine, 2013. "The health effects of leaving school in a bad economy," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 951-964.
  2. Bastian Ravesteijn & Hans van Kippersluis & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2013. "The Wear and Tear on Health: What Is the Role of Occupation?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 618, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  3. Ayala, Luis & Rodríguez, Magdalena, 2013. "Health-related effects of welfare-to-work policies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 103-112.
  4. Meyer S.C. & Künn-Nelen A.C., 2014. "Do occupational demands explain the educational gradient in health?," Research Memorandum, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE) 016, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
  5. Bastian Ravesteijn & Hans van Kippersluis & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2013. "The Wear and Tear on Health: What is the Role of Occupation?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-143/V, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Daniel Lau & Dario Pozzoli, 2012. "The Impact of Education and Occupation on Temporary and Permanent Work Incapacity," Economics Working Papers, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus 2012-25, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
  7. Ravesteijn, Bastian & van Kippersluis, Hans & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2013. "The Wear and Tear on Health: What is the Role of Occupation?," MPRA Paper 50321, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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