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Ethnic Competition and Specialization

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Author Info

  • Kahanec, Martin

    ()
    (Central European University)

Abstract

Are ethnic specialization and thus a downward sloping labor demand curve fundamental features of labor market competition between ethnic groups? In a general equilibrium model, this paper argues that spillover effects in skill acquisition and social distances between ethnic groups engender equilibrium regimes of skill acquisition that differ in their implications for ethnic specialization. Specifically, fundamental relationships through which relative group sizes determine whether ethnic specialization arises and in what degree are established. Thus, this paper theoretically justifies a downward sloping labor demand curve and explains why some ethnic groups earn more than others, ethnic minorities underperforming or outperforming majorities.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 3167.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Gil Epstein and Ira Gang (eds.), Migration and Culture, Frontiers of Economics and Globalization, Vol. 8, Emerald Publishing, Bingley, 2010, 205-229
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3167

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Related research

Keywords: human capital; ethnic group; labor market; ethnic specialization; spillover effects;

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References

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  1. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
  2. Grant, James H & Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1981. "Labor Market Competition among Youths, White Women and Others," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(3), pages 354-60, August.
  3. Marco J. van der Leij & I. Sebastian Buhai, 2008. "A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation," Working Papers 2008.31, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  4. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2005. "Learning about a new technology: pineapple in Ghana," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  5. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-61, September.
  6. Munshi, Kaivan, 2004. "Social learning in a heterogeneous population: technology diffusion in the Indian Green Revolution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 185-213, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "International Migration, Ethnicity and Economic Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 3450, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "Migration, the Quality of the Labour Force and Economic Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 3560, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Kahanec, Martin & Zaiceva, Anzelika & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2010. "Ethnic Minorities in the European Union: An Overview," IZA Discussion Papers 5397, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Kahanec, Martin & Constant, Amelie F. & DeVoretz, Don J. & Gataullina, Liliya & Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2008. "Report No. 16: Study on the Social and Labour Market Integration of Ethnic Minorities," IZA Research Reports 16, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Andrén, Daniela, 2012. "Romanians, Hungarians and their wages, in transition, in Romania," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2673-2685.
  6. Andrén, Daniela, 2010. ""In every rank, or great or small, ’Tis industry supports us all": Romanians and ethnic Hungarians, and their wages, in transition," Working Papers 2010:1, Örebro University, School of Business.

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