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Is There a New Urbanism? The Growth of U. S. Cities in the 1990s

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  • Edwarad L. Glaeser
  • Jesse Shapiro

Abstract

The 1990s were an unusually good decade for the largest American cities and, in particular, for the cities of the Midwest. However, fundamentally urban growth in the 1990s looked extremely similar to urban growth during the prior post-war decades. The growth of cities was determined by three large trends: (1) cities with strong human capital bases grew faster than cities without skills, (2) people moved to warmer, drier places, and (3) cities built around the automobile replaced cities that rely on public transportation. In the 1990s (as in the 1980s), more local government spending was associated with slower growth, unless that spending was on highways. We shouldn’t be surprised by the lack of change in patterns of urban growth, after all the correlation of city growth rates across decades is generally over 70 percent.

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Paper provided by Harvard - Institute of Economic Research in its series Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers with number 1925.

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Date of creation: 2001
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Handle: RePEc:fth:harver:1925

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  1. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn, 2001. "Decentralized Employment and the Transformation of the American City," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1912, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Duncan Black & Vernon Henderson, 1999. "A Theory of Urban Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 252-284, April.
  3. Glaeser, Edward L. & Scheinkman, JoseA. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1995. "Economic growth in a cross-section of cities," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 117-143, August.
  4. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn & Jordan Rappaport, 2000. "Why Do The Poor Live In Cities?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1891, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  5. Mills Edwin S. & Lubuele Luan' Sende, 1995. "Projecting Growth of Metropolitan Areas," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 344-360, May.
  6. Ed Glaeser & Jed Kolko & Albert Saiz, 2000. "Consumer City," NBER Working Papers 7790, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. John Luke Gallup & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Mellinger, 1999. "Geography and Economic Development," CID Working Papers 1, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  8. Gallup, J.L. & Sachs, J.D. & Mullinger, A., 1999. "Geography and Economic Development," Papers 1, Chicago - Graduate School of Business.
  9. Jonathan Eaton & Zvi Eckstein, 1994. "Cities and Growth: Theory and Evidence from France and Japan," NBER Working Papers 4612, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Simon, Curtis J. & Nardinelli, Clark, 1996. "The Talk of the Town: Human Capital, Information, and the Growth of English Cities, 1861 to 1961," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 384-413, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Irina Alina Popescu, 2013. "Workforce Professional Skills Development in Times of Economic Crisis," Management, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 8(2), pages 139-155.
  2. Franz-Josef Bade & Claus-Friedrich Laaser & Rüdiger Soltwedel, 2004. "Urban Specialization in the Internet Age � Empirical Findings for Germany," Kiel Working Papers 1215, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  3. William Shobe & John L. Knapp, 2007. "The Economic Impact of the University of Virginia: How a Major Research University Affects the Local and State Economies," Reports 2007-01, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
  4. Cuberes, David, 2008. "A Model of Sequential City Growth," MPRA Paper 8431, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Elisabet Viladecans Marsal, 2002. "The growth of cities: Does agglomeration matter?," Working Papers 2002/3, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  6. Humphreys, Brad & Zhou, Li, 2013. "Sports Facilities, Agglomeration, and Urban Redevelopment," Working Papers 2013-4, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  7. Jeremy Lawson & Jacqueline Dwyer, 2002. "Labour Market Adjustment in Regional Australia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2002-04, Reserve Bank of Australia.

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