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Urban decentralization and income inequality: Is sprawl associated with rising income segregation across neighborhoods?

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  • Christopher H. Wheeler

Abstract

Existing research has found an inverse relationship between urban density and the degree of income inequality within metropolitan areas, suggesting that, as cities spread out, they become increasingly segregated by income. This paper examines this hypothesis using data covering more than 160000 block groups within 359 US metropolitan areas over the years 1980, 1990, and 2000. The findings indicate that income inequality - defined by the variance of the log household income distribution - does indeed rise significantly as urban density declines. This increase, however, is associated with rising inequality within block groups as cities spread out. The extent of income variation exhibited between different block groups, by contrast, shows virtually no association with population density. There is, accordingly, little evidence that sprawl is systematically associated with greater residential segregation of households by income.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its series Working Papers with number 2006-037.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Publication status: Published in Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Regional Economic Development, October 2008, 4(1), pp. 41-57
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2006-037

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Keywords: Income distribution ; Income;

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  14. Christopher H. Wheeler, 2004. "Wage inequality and urban density," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 421-437, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Christopher H. Wheeler, 2007. "Trends in neighborhood-level unemployment in the United States: 1980 to 2000," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 123-142.

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