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Some implications of increased cooperation in world oil conservation

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  • Stephen P.A. Brown
  • Hillard G. Huntington

Abstract

In this article, Stephen Brown and Hillard Huntington combine recent studies of world oil markets and the nascent literature on damage estimates from carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to derive cost and benefit curves for the reduction of these emissions through cooperative programs of oil conservation. Their analysis shows that the desirability of extending cooperation in global energy conservation policies is essentially an empirical issue rather than a conceptual one. The current evidence suggests that over the next two decades, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development will have an incentive to reduce its oil consumption and the associated CO2 emissions by more than is optimal from a world perspective. During this period, extending cooperation to the oil-importing developing countries may push oil conservation too far.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its series Working Papers with number 9608.

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Date of creation: 1996
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Handle: RePEc:fip:feddwp:96-08

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Keywords: Petroleum industry and trade;

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  2. Hoel Michael, 1994. "Efficient Climate Policy in the Presence of Free Riders," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 259-274, November.
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  16. Stephen P. A. Brown & Hillard G. Huntington, 1994. "The Economic Cost Of U.S. Oil Conservation," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(3), pages 42-53, 07.
  17. David M Newbery, 1992. "Should Carbon Taxes Be Additional to Other Transport Fuel Taxes?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 49-60.
  18. Felder Stefan & Rutherford Thomas F., 1993. "Unilateral CO2 Reductions and Carbon Leakage: The Consequences of International Trade in Oil and Basic Materials," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 162-176, September.
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