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National Determinants of Vegetarianism

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  • Leahy, Eimear
  • Lyons, Seán
  • Tol, Richard S. J.

Abstract

In this paper we use panel data regressions to investigate the determinants of vegetarianism in various countries over time. Using national level aggregate data, we construct a panel consisting of 116 country-time observations. We find that there is a negative relationship between income and vegetarianism. In relatively poor countries, vegetarianism appears to be a necessity as opposed to a dietary choice. For the well educated however, vegetarianism is becoming a more popular lifestyle choice. Results also suggest that in relatively poor countries local production of meat increases consumption of meat. This is the first paper to examine national level determinants of vegetarianism.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) in its series Papers with number WP341.

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Date of creation: Apr 2010
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Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp341

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Keywords: panel data/regression;

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References

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  1. Carol Newman & Maeve Henchion, 2001. "Infrequency of purchase and double-hurdle models of Irish households' meat expenditure," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 393-420, December.
  2. Jeffrey Reimer & Thomas Hertel, 2004. "Estimation of International Demand Behaviour for Use with Input-Output Based Data," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 347-366.
  3. Gould, Brian W. & Lee, Yoonjung & Dong, Diansheng & Villarreal, Hector J., 2002. "Household Size And Composition Impacts On Meat Demand In Mexico: A Censored Demand System Approach," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19722, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  4. Benjamin J. DeAngelo, Francisco C. de la Chesnaye, Robert H. Beach, Allan Sommer and Brian C. Murray , 2006. "Methane and Nitrous Oxide Mitigation in Agriculture," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 89-108.
  5. M. Burton & M. Tomlinson & T. Young, 1994. "Consumers' Decisions Whether Or Not To Purchase Meat: A Double Hurdle Analysis Of Single Adult Households," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 202-212.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Vegetarianism and income
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-06-30 14:35:00
  2. The Relationship Between Income and Vegetarianism
    by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-07-01 10:28:23

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  1. Economic Logic blog

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