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Who delays childbearing? The relationships between fertility, education and personality traits

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  • Tavares, Lara Patrício

Abstract

Using data from the British Household Panel Survey, this paper assesses the influence of personality traits on the timing of motherhood and investigates whether, and in what way, personality traits can explain the differences in maternity timing between more and less educated women. We estimate a log-logistic model of the time to first child birth and show that there is a statistically significant relationship between the Big Five personality traits and timing to motherhood. The results also show that within the more educated group, women who have an average to high score on Openness have lower hazards of childbirth.

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File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/publications/working-papers/iser/2010-17.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2010-17.

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Date of creation: 24 May 2010
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2010-17

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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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References

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  1. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-20 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Kaplan, Greg & Goodman, Alissa & Ian Walker, 2004. "Understanding The Effects Of Early Motherhood In Britain : The Effects On Mothers," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 706, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  3. Warren Miller, 1992. "Personality traits and developmental experiences as antecedents of childbearing motivation," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 265-285, May.
  4. Peng Yu, 2006. "Higher Education, the Bane of Fertility? An investigation with the HILDA Survey," CEPR Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University 512, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  5. Vladimir M. Shkolnikov & Evgueni M. Andreev & René Houle & James W. Vaupel, 2004. "To concentration of reproduction in cohorts of US and European women," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-027, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  6. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-04 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Stephan Klasen & Andrey Launov, 2006. "Analysis of the determinants of fertility decline in the Czech Republic," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 25-54, February.
  8. Wendy Sigle-Rushton, 2008. "England and Wales: stable fertility and pronounced social status differences," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 31307, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  9. Holger von der Lippe, 2006. "On the psychological determinants of fertility: a panorama of concepts and approaches, and evidence from eastern Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-050, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  10. Justin McCrary & Heather Royer, 2006. "The Effect of Female Education on Fertility and Infant Health: Evidence from School Entry Policies Using Exact Date of Birth," NBER Working Papers 12329, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Cigno, Alessandro & Ermisch, John, 1989. "A microeconomic analysis of the timing of births," European Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 737-760, April.
  12. Elizabeth Ty Wilde & Lily Batchelder & David T. Ellwood, 2010. "The Mommy Track Divides: The Impact of Childbearing on Wages of Women of Differing Skill Levels," NBER Working Papers 16582, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
  14. Catherine Hakim, 2003. "A New Approach to Explaining Fertility Patterns: Preference Theory," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., The Population Council, Inc., vol. 29(3), pages 349-374.
  15. Amalia Miller, 2011. "The effects of motherhood timing on career path," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 1071-1100, July.
  16. Bloemen, Hans & Kalwij, Adriaan S., 2001. "Female labor market transitions and the timing of births: a simultaneous analysis of the effects of schooling," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 8(5), pages 593-620, December.
  17. Ermisch, John & Ogawa, Naohiro, 1994. "Age at Motherhood in Japan," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 393-420, November.
  18. Wendy Sigle-Rushton, 2008. "England and Wales: Stable fertility and pronounced social status differences," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(15), pages 455-502, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Shelly Lundberg, 2012. "Personality and marital surplus," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-21, December.
  2. Anna Baranowska & Anna Matysiak, 2011. "Does parenthood increase happiness? Evidence for Poland," Working Papers 38, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  3. Jessica Nisén & Pekka Martikainen & Jaakko Kaprio & Karri Silventoinen, 2013. "Educational Differences in Completed Fertility: A Behavioral Genetic Study of Finnish Male and Female Twins," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1399-1420, August.
  4. Shelly Lundberg, 2011. "Psychology and Family Economics," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(s1), pages 66-81, 05.

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