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A New Approach to Explaining Fertility Patterns: Preference Theory

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  • Catherine Hakim
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    Abstract

    Preference theory is a new approach to explaining current and future patterns of employment and fertility among women in modern societies. Although economists usually claim that preferences cannot be measured, methods for identifying women's and men's lifestyle preferences were developed and applied in British (and Spanish) national surveys, confirming the results of previous British and American studies showing three distinct lifestyle preference groups. The results confirm the heterogeneity of women's preferences and suggest that preferences are the primary determinant of fertility and employment decisions. The implications for policies to raise fertility are discussed. Copyright 2003 by The Population Council, Inc..

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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1728-4457.2003.00349.x
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by The Population Council, Inc. in its journal Population and Development Review.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 349-374

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:29:y:2003:i:3:p:349-374

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    Cited by:
    1. Polin, Veronica & Sartor, Nicola, 2009. "Family Intertemporal Fiscal Incidence: A new Methodology for Assessing Public Policies," MPRA Paper 25570, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ian Dey & Fran Wasoff, 2010. "Another Child? Fertility Ideals, Resources and Opportunities," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 29(6), pages 921-940, December.
    3. Anna Kurowska & Michal Myck & Katharina Wrohlich, 2012. "Family and Labor Market Choices: Requirements to Guide Effective Evidence-Based Policy," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1234, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Bilal Barakat & Rachel Durham, 2013. "Drop-out mayors and graduate farmers: Educational fertility differentials by occupational status and industry in six European countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(42), pages 1213-1262, June.
    5. Zsolt Spéder, 2006. "Rudiments of recent fertility decline in Hungary," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(8), pages 253-288, October.
    6. David De Wachter & Karel Neels, 2011. "Educational differentials in fertility intentions and outcomes: family formation in Flanders in the early 1990s," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 9(1), pages 227-258.
    7. Vladimir M. Shkolnikov & Evgueni M. Andreev & René Houle & James W. Vaupel, 2004. "To concentration of reproduction in cohorts of US and European women," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-027, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    8. Stanca, Luca, 2012. "Suffer the little children: Measuring the effects of parenthood on well-being worldwide," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 742-750.
    9. Suzanne Noordhuizen & Paul Graaf & Inge Sieben, 2010. "The Public Acceptance of Voluntary Childlessness in the Netherlands: from 20 to 90 per cent in 30 years," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 99(1), pages 163-181, October.
    10. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2014. "The causal effects of the number of children on female employment-do European institutional and gender conditions matter?," Working Papers 64, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    11. Lara Tavares, 2008. "Who delays childbearing? The relationships between fertility, education and personality traits," Working Papers 009, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    12. Anne Gauthier & Christoph Bühler & Joshua Goldstein & Saskia Hin, 2011. "Fertility preferences: what measuring second choices teaches us," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 9(1), pages 131-156.
    13. Rafael Barrera Gutiérrez, 2011. "El vacío institucional en el modelo de elección racional aplicado a la fecundidad," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 13(25), pages 223-248, July-Dece.
    14. Andras Simonovits, 2014. "Optimal Child Allowances with Heterogeneous Fertilities," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1401, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    15. Beatrice Chromková Manuea & Petr Fučík, 2011. "Couple disagreement about fertility preferences and family-friendly policy measures in the Czech Republic," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 9(1), pages 335-344.
    16. EJEKWUMADU Esther Ugomma & MADU Ignatius Ani & AJAERO Chukwuedozie Kelechukwu, 2009. "The effects of migration and fertility on the age-sex structure of Lagos State, Nigeria," Economia. Seria Management, Faculty of Management, Academy of Economic Studies, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 12(2), pages 28-38, December.
    17. Monika Mynarska & Anna Matysiak, 2010. "Women's determination to combine childbearing and paid employment: How can a qualitative approach help us understand quantitative evidence?," Working Papers 26, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.

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