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The structure of migration in Estonia: survey-based evidence

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  • Martti Randveer

    ()

  • Tairi Rõõm

    ()

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    Abstract

    This paper presents new evidence from a unique survey of firm managers on migration patterns in Estonia in 2007. An average emigrant from Estonia was most likely a young person between 15-34 years of age, a blue-collar worker and male. Contrary to evidence from other countries and/or earlier time periods, employees with a low level of education were more likely to emigrate than highly educated workers. We assessed which enterprises were more exposed to the crossborder movement of workers. The vast majority (97%) of emigrants left from private sector enterprises. Most immigrant workers were employed by private sector companies as well. Firms hiring a larger share of low-skilled blue-collar workers were more exposed to the mobility of international labour. The regression results indicated that the tendency to emigrate was the strongest among construction sector employees, whereas immigrant workers were most likely hired by manufacturing companies

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    File URL: http://www.eestipank.info/pub/en/dokumendid/publikatsioonid/seeriad/uuringud/_2009/_1_2009/_wp_109.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Bank of Estonia in its series Bank of Estonia Working Papers with number 2009-01.

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    Date of creation: 14 Jul 2009
    Date of revision: 14 Jul 2009
    Handle: RePEc:eea:boewps:wp2009-01

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    Keywords: immigration; emigration; survey;

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    1. David G. Blanchflower & Chris Shadforth, 2007. "Fear, Unemployment and Migration," NBER Working Papers 13506, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alan Barrett & Seamus McGuinness & Martin O'Brien, 2008. "The Immigrant Earnings Disadvantage Across the Earnings and Skills Distributions: The Case of Immigrants from the EU's New Member States in Ireland," Papers WP236, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Stephen Drinkwater & John Eade & Michal Garapich, 2006. "Poles Apart? EU Enlargement and the Labour Market Outcomes of immigrants in the UK," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1706, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    4. William Carrington & Enrica Detragiache, 1998. "How Big is the Brain Drain?," IMF Working Papers 98/102, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Wadensjö, Eskil, 2007. "Migration to Sweden from the New EU Member States," IZA Discussion Papers 3190, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Docquier, Frederic & Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2004. "Measuring the international mobility of skilled workers (1990-2000) : release 1.0," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3381, The World Bank.
    7. Bonin, Holger & Eichhorst, Werner & Florman, Christer & Hansen, Mette Okkels & Skiöld, Lena & Stuhler, Jan & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos & Thomasen, Henrik & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "Report No. 19: Geographic Mobility in the European Union: Optimising its Economic and Social Benefits," IZA Research Reports 19, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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