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Intra-family Transfers in Japan: Intergenerational Co-residence, Distance, andContact

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  • Ken Yamada

Abstract

Classified broadly, two motives for intra-family transfers exist: altruism and selfishness. This paper examines two selfish hypotheses | the exchange motive (strategic bequest motive)and the demonstration effect | using a new Japanese micro data set. My analysis of the determinants of intergenerational co-residence, distance between residences, and frequency of contact yields considerable support for the exchange motive but no support for the demonstration effect. The findings are consistent with the exchange motive after distinguishing it from mutual altruism using a specific question.

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Paper provided by Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University in its series ISER Discussion Paper with number 0575.

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Date of creation: Mar 2003
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Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:0575

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  1. Ernst Fehr & Simon Gaechter, . "Fairness and Retaliation: The Economics of Reciprocitys," IEW - Working Papers 040, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  2. Cox, Donald & Rank, Mark R, 1992. "Inter-vivos Transfers and Intergenerational Exchange," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 305-14, May.
  3. Joulfaian, D. & Wilheim, M.O., 1992. "Inheritance and Labor Supply," Papers 6-92-2, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  4. Bernheim, B Douglas & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages S151-82, July.
  5. Francois-Charles Wolff, 2001. "Private intergenerational contact in France and the demonstration effect," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 143-153.
  6. Stark,Oded, 1999. "Altruism and Beyond," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521663731, April.
  7. Joseph G. Altonji & Fumio Hayashi & Laurence J. Kotlikoff, 1989. "Is the Extended Family Altruistically Linked? Direct Tests Using Micro Data," NBER Working Papers 3046, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2001. "Are the Japanese Selfish, Altruistic, or Dynastic?," ISER Discussion Paper 0556, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  9. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-93, Nov.-Dec..
  10. Thomas A. Barthold & Takatoshi Ito, 1992. "Bequest Taxes and Accumulation of Household Wealth: U.S.-Japan Comparison," NBER Chapters, in: The Political Economy of Tax Reform, NBER-EASE Volume 1, pages 235-292 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Cox, Donald, 1987. "Motives for Private Income Transfers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 508-46, June.
  12. Joseph G. Altonji & Fumio Hayashi & Laurence Kotlikoff, 1996. "The Effects of Income and Wealth on Time and Money Transfers between Parents and Children," NBER Working Papers 5522, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Jellal, Mohamed & wolff, François charles, 2000. "Shaping intergenerational relationships the demonstration effect," MPRA Paper 38512, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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Cited by:
  1. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2011. "Intergenerational cohabitation in modern Indonesia: filial support and dependence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(S1), pages 87-104, 09.
  2. Yin, Ting, 2010. "Parent-child co-residence and bequest motives in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 521-531, December.
  3. Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Yuji Horioka, 2006. "Is the Eldest Son Different? The Residential Choice of Siblings in Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0674, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  4. Iwata, Shinichiro & Yukutake, Norifumi, 2013. "Housing subsidy or parental support: Crowding-out effect of mortgage tax deduction," MPRA Paper 46647, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Norifumi Yukutake & Shinichiro Iwata & Takako Idee, 2011. "Strategic Interaction between Inter Vivos Gifts and Housing Acquisition," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd11-201, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  6. Mitrut, Andreea & Wolff, François-Charles, 2009. "A causal test of the demonstration effect theory," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 52-54, April.

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