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Is the eldest son different? The residential choice of siblings in Japan

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  • Wakabayashi, Midori
  • Horioka, Charles Yuji

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze the determinants of the living arrangements (coresidence behavior) of elderly parents and their children (whether elderly parents live with their children, and if so, with which child) in Japan using micro-data from a household survey. Our results provide support for all four explanations of coresidence behavior but especially for the life cycle and dynasty models (both of which assume selfishly motivated parents) and social norms and traditions: the fact that parents who were self-employed before retirement are more likely to live with their children, the fact that parents are less likely to live with sons who adopt their wife's surname, and the fact that parents are more likely to live with daughters whose husbands adopt their surname constitute evidence in favor of the dynasty model. The fact that parents who were (relatively wealthy) executives before retirement and parents who are homeowners are more likely to live with their children and the fact that parents are more likely to live with less educated children constitute evidence in favor of the selfish life cycle model (or the altruism model). And the fact that parental attitudes toward their children affect their coresidence behavior, the fact that parents are more likely to live with their eldest child if their eldest child is a son, and the fact that parents are most likely to live with their eldest son even if he is not the eldest child constitute evidence in favor of social norms and traditions.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Japan and the World Economy.

Volume (Year): 21 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 337-348

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Handle: RePEc:eee:japwor:v:21:y:2009:i:4:p:337-348

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505557

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Keywords: Aged Altruism model Bequest motive Bequests Care of the elderly Children Consumer economics Coresidence Culture Dynasty model Economics of the elderly Elderly Eldest son Family business Family economics Family line Household behavior Japan Life cycle model Living arrangements Parents Primogeniture Residential choice Selfish life cycle model Siblings Social norms Strategic bequest motive Traditions;

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  1. Steven Stern & Tennille J. Neuharth, 2000. "Shared Caregiving Responsibilities of Adult Siblings with Elderly Parents," Virginia Economics Online Papers 323, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. James Raymo & Yanfei Zhou, 2012. "Living Arrangements and the Well-Being of Single Mothers in Japan," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 31(5), pages 727-749, October.
  2. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2009. "Do Bequests Increase or Decrease Wealth Inequalities?," NBER Working Papers 14639, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Ting Yin, 2009. "Parent-Child Co-residence and Bequest Motives in China," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 09-26, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  4. Wei-hsin Yu & Kuo-hsien Su & Chi-Tsun Chiu, 2012. "Sibship Characteristics and Transition to First Marriage in Taiwan: Explaining Gender Asymmetries," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 31(4), pages 609-636, August.
  5. Kureishi, Wataru & Wakabayashi, Midori, 2010. "Why do first-born children live together with parents?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 159-172, August.
  6. Francisca Antman, 2007. "Who Cares for the Elderly? Intrafamily Resource Allocation and Migration in Mexico," Discussion Papers 06-031, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  7. Andreas Ziegler, 2010. "Z-Tests in Multinomial Probit Models under Simulated Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Some Small Sample Properties," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 230(5), pages 630-652, October.

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