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Un análisis de los efectos de las restricciones de liquidez en la acumulación de capital humano: Evidencia para Nicaragua

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  • María Noelia Garbero

    (CEDLAS,UNLP - CONICET)

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    Abstract

    This paper provides original empirical evidence on the evolution of education inequality for all Latin American countries over the decades of 1990 and 2000. The analysis covers a wide range of issues on differences in educational outcomes and opportunities across the population, including inequality in years of education, gaps in school enrollment, wage skill differentials and public social expenditure. The evidence indicates a significant difference between the 1990s and the 2000s in terms of both the assessment of the equity of the education expansion and its impact on the income distribution. In particular, the changes in the 2000s seem to have had a full equalizing impact on earnings given the more pro-poor pattern of the education upgrading and a more stable or even increasing relative demand for low skill labor.

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    File URL: http://cedlas.econo.unlp.edu.ar/archivos_upload/doc_cedlas136.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata in its series CEDLAS, Working Papers with number 0136.

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    Length: 62 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0136

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    3. Joshua Goodman, . "Skills, Schools, and Credit Constraints: Evidence from Massachusetts," Working Paper 95646, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    4. Yasuyuki SAWADA & Kensuke KUBO & Nobuhiko FUWA & Seiro ITO & Takashi KUROSAKI, 2006. "On The Mother And Child Labor Nexus Under Credit Constraints: Findings From Rural India," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 44(4), pages 465-499.
    5. Gamal Ibrahim & Abbi Kedir & Sebastian Torres, 2007. "Household-level Credit Constraints in Urban Ethiopia," Discussion Papers in Economics 07/03, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    6. Stephen P. Zeldes, . "Consumption and Liquidity Constraints: An Empirical Investigation," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 16-88, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
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    8. Ricardo Bebczuk, 2009. "SME Access to Credit in Guatemala and Nicaragua: Challenging Conventional Wisdom with New Evidence," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0080, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    9. R. Glenn Hubbard & Kenneth L. Judd, 1986. "Liquidity Constraints, Fiscal Policy, and Consumption," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 17(1), pages 1-60.
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    13. Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd Stinebrickner, 2008. "The Effect of Credit Constraints on the College Drop-Out Decision: A Direct Approach Using a New Panel Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 2163-84, December.
    14. Jacoby, Hanan G, 1994. "Borrowing Constraints and Progress through School: Evidence from Peru," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(1), pages 151-60, February.
    15. Hall, Robert E & Mishkin, Frederic S, 1982. "The Sensitivity of Consumption to Transitory Income: Estimates from Panel Data on Households," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(2), pages 461-81, March.
    16. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 9.
    17. Li, Wenli, 2007. "Family background, financial constraints and higher education attendance in China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 724-734, December.
    18. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman, 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post--secondary Schooling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 705-734, October.
    19. Pitt, Mark M. & Khandker, Shahidur R. & Cartwright, Jennifer, 2003. "Does micro-credit empower women : evidence from Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2998, The World Bank.
    20. Mariana Alfonso, 2009. "Credit Constraints and the Demand for Higher Education in Latin America," IDB Publications 9314, Inter-American Development Bank.
    21. Diagne, Aliou & Zeller, Manfred & Sharma, Manohar, 2000. "Empirical measurements of households' access to credit and credit constraints in developing countries," FCND briefs 90, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    22. Jappelli, Tullio, 1990. "Who Is Credit Constrained in the U.S. Economy?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 105(1), pages 219-34, February.
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