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Intergenerational transmission of education - Uncovering the mechanisms behind high intergenerational correlations

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  • Florian Wendelspiess Chávez Juárez

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Geneva)

Abstract

Education is a main player in social mobility, however, it remains unclear through which channel the high observed intergenerational correlations of educational attainment are produced. The literature proposed very different mechanisms that could drive these correlations. This paper uses a structural equation model and data from Mexico to estimate the relative importance of the main channels simultaneously. The results sustain all of the most commonly proposed mechanisms and underline the importance to look at them simultaneously. The economic situation of a family has a large direct effect on children's schooling attainment, even when controlling for all other possible channels. Parental education has direct and indirect effects through the economic situation. Together, these two findings clearly reject the hypothesis that the educational correlations are only the fruit of a transmission of ability from one generation to the next and sustaining the idea that some inequality of opportunity is present.

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File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2011-234.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality in its series Working Papers with number 234.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2011-234

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Web page: http://www.ecineq.org
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Keywords: intergenerational transmission of education; social mobility; IQ transmission; inequality.;

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  1. Christoph Winter, 2009. "Accounting for the changing role of family income in determining college entry," IEW - Working Papers 402, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich, revised Dec 2011.
  2. Tom Hertz & Tamara Jayasundera & Patrizio Piraino & Sibel Selcuk & Nicole Smith & Alina Verashchagina, 2007. "The Inheritance of Educational Inequality: International Comparisons and Fifty-Year Trends," Working Papers 2007-013, American University, Department of Economics.
  3. Mariano Rojas, 2007. "A Subjective Well-being Equivalence Scale for Mexico: Estimation and Poverty and Income-distribution Implications," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 273-293.
  4. Todd R. Stinebrickner & Ralph Stinebrickner, 2007. "The Effect of Credit Constraints on the College Drop-Out Decision: A Direct Approach Using a New Panel Study," University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity Working Papers 20071, University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity.
  5. Orazio Attanasio & Katja Kaufmann, 2009. "Educational Choices, Subjective Expectations, and Credit Constraints," NBER Working Papers 15087, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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