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Dynamic Modelling of the Demand for Money in Latvia

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  • Boriss Siliverstovs

Abstract

This study develops a parsimonious stable coefficient money demand model for Latvia for the period from 1996 till 2005. A single cointegrating vector between the real money balances, the gross domestic product, the long-term interest rate, and the rate of inflation is found. Our study contributes to better understanding of the factors shaping the demand for money in the new Member States of the European Union that committed themselves to adopting of the Euro currency in the near future.

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.60156.de/dp703.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin with number 703.

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Length: 23 p.
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp703

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Keywords: M2 money demand; stability; new EU member states; Latvia;

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  1. Boriss Siliverstovs, 2008. "Dynamic modelling of the demand for money in Latvia," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 8(1), pages 53-74, October.
  2. Dreger, Christian & Reimers, Hans-Eggert & Roffia, Barbara, 2006. "Long-run money demand in the new EU Member States with exchange rate effects," Working Paper Series 0628, European Central Bank.
  3. Johansen, S., 1991. "Testing Weak Exogeneity and the Order of Cointegration in UK Money Demand Data," Papers 78, Helsinki - Department of Economics.
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  7. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Michael P. Barry, 2000. "Stability of the Demand for Money in an Unstable Country: Russia," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 22(4), pages 619-629, July.
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  18. Markus Knell & Helmut Stix, 2003. "How Robustare Money Demand Estimations? A Meta-Analytic Approach," Working Papers 81, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
  19. Markus Knell & Helmut Stix, 2004. "Three Decades of Money Demand Studies. Some Differences and Remarkable Similarities," Working Papers 88, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
  20. Oomes, Nienke & Ohnsorge, Franziska, 2005. "Money demand and inflation in dollarized economies: The case of Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 462-483, September.
  21. Osterwald-Lenum, Michael, 1992. "A Note with Quantiles of the Asymptotic Distribution of the Maximum Likelihood Cointegration Rank Test Statistics," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 54(3), pages 461-72, August.
  22. Mankiw, N. Gregory, 1992. "The reincarnation of Keynesian economics," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(2-3), pages 559-565, April.
  23. Carlo C. A. Winder & Martin M. G. Fase, 1998. "Wealth and the demand for money in the European union," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 507-524.
  24. Godfrey, Leslie G, 1978. "Testing for Higher Order Serial Correlation in Regression Equations When the Regressors Include Lagged Dependent Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1303-10, November.
  25. Stefka Slavova, 2003. "Money demand during hyperinflation and stabilization: Bulgaria, 1991-2000," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(11), pages 1303-1316.
  26. Christian Dreger & Jürgen Wolters, 2006. "Investigating M3 Money Demand in the Euro Area: New Evidence Based on Standard Models," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 561, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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  28. Engle, Robert F, 1982. "Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity with Estimates of the Variance of United Kingdom Inflation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 987-1007, July.
  29. Ivars Tillers, 2004. "Money Demand in Latvia," Working Papers 2004/03, Latvijas Banka.
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Cited by:
  1. Boriss Siliverstovs, 2008. "Dynamic modelling of the demand for money in Latvia," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 8(1), pages 53-74, October.

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