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Money demand in Hungary and Poland

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  • Claudia Buch

Abstract

This paper analyses the determinants and the stability of money demand functions in Hungary and Poland, using an error-correction framework. The null of stable cointegration relationships cannot be rejected in some specifications. The results suggest that long-run parameters are in line with economic theory. While judging the appropriateness of different strategies of monetary policy on the basis of these findings alone would be premature, the paper suggests that money demand functions can serve as a useful reference for monetary authorities.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 33 (2001)
Issue (Month): 8 ()
Pages: 989-999

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:33:y:2001:i:8:p:989-999

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Cited by:
  1. Boriss Siliverstovs, 2007. "Dynamic Modelling of the Demand for Money in Latvia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 703, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Balazs Egert, 2007. "Real Convergence, Price Level Convergence and Inflation Differentials in Europe," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp895, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  3. Jarko Fidrmuc, 2009. "Money demand and disinflation in selected CEECs during the accession to the EU," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(10), pages 1259-1267.
  4. Boriss Siliverstovs, 2007. "Money Demand in Estonia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 675, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  5. Christian Dreger & Hans-Eggert Reimers & Barbara Roffia, 2007. "Long-Run Money Demand in the New EU Member States with Exchange Rate Effects," Eastern European Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 45(2), pages 75-94, April.
  6. Sánchez, Marcelo, 2010. "Modelling anti-inflationary monetary targeting: with an application to Romania," Working Paper Series 1186, European Central Bank.
  7. Ferda HALICIOGLU & Mehmet UGUR, 2005. "On Stability of the Demand for Money in a Developing OECD," Macroeconomics 0508001, EconWPA.
  8. Balázs Égert & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Transition Economies: Surveying the Surveyable," MNB Working Papers 2006/5, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (the central bank of Hungary).
  9. Kierzenkowski, Rafal, 2002. "The Multi-Regime Bank Lending Channel and the Effectiveness of the Polish Monetary Policy Transmission During Transition," CEPR Discussion Papers 3624, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Michaël GOUJON & Sylviane GUILLAUMONT JEANNENEY & Christopher ADAM, 2002. "Currency substitution and the transactions demand for money in Vietnam," Working Papers 200228, CERDI.
  11. Natasa Erjavec, 2003. "Applied macroeconometrics in transition economy: Croatian experience," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 23444, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  12. James Payne, 2003. "Post stabilization estimates of money demand in Croatia: error correction model using the bounds testing approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(16), pages 1723-1727.
  13. Ozturk, Ilhan & Acaravci, Ali, 2008. "The Demand for Money in Transition Economies," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 5(2), pages 35-43, June.
  14. Nikolaos Dritsakis, 2011. "Demand for Money in Hungary: An ARDL Approach," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 1, pages 01-16, November.
  15. repec:onb:oenbwp:y::i:138:b:1 is not listed on IDEAS
  16. Kierzenkowski, Rafal, 2005. "The multi-regime bank lending channel and the effectiveness of the Polish monetary policy transmission during transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 1-24, March.

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