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A client-community assessment of the NGO sector in Uganda

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  • Abigail Barr
  • Marcel Fafchamps

Abstract

Using original survey data on beneficiary assessment, we examine the performance of the NGO sector in Uganda. In general satisfaction with NGO intervention is high. We find evidence that NGOs endeavour to redress the balance between rich and poor communities but also that NGOs neglect isolated communities, possibly for cost reasons, and that the accessibility of NGOs to beneficiary communities is lower in poor communities. These factors significantly reduce client-community satisfaction with NGOS. Levels of NGO induced community participation in decision making also vary, with some evidence that participation has an effect on community satisfaction. Some NGO staff are perceived as unresponsive, less than good at what they do, and self-serving, and these perceptions also have a negative impact on community satisfaction.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford in its series CSAE Working Paper Series with number 2004-23.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2004-23

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  1. Glaeser, Edward L & Sacerdote, Bruce & Scheinkman, Jose A, 1996. "Crime and Social Interactions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 111(2), pages 507-48, May.
  2. Sharma, Manohar & Zeller, Manfred, 1999. "Placement and Outreach of Group-Based Credit Organizations: The Cases of ASA, BRAC, and PROSHIKA in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 27(12), pages 2123-2136, December.
  3. Abigail Barr & Marcel Fafchamps & Trudy Owens, 2004. "The Resources and Governance of Non-Governmental Organizations in Uganda," Development and Comp Systems, EconWPA 0409047, EconWPA.
  4. Marcel Fafchamps & Trudy Owens, 2006. "Is International Funding Crowding Out Charitable Contributions in African NGOs?," Economics Series Working Papers, University of Oxford, Department of Economics GPRG-WPS-055, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Pérouse de Montclos, Marc-Antoine, 2012. "Humanitarian action in developing countries: Who evaluates who?," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 154-160.
  2. Dirk-Jan Koch & Axel Dreher & Peter Nunnenkamp & Rainer Thiele, 2008. "Keeping a Low Profile: What Determines the Allocation of Aid by Non-Governmental Organizations?," KOF Working papers, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich 08-191, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  3. Abigail Barr & Marcel Fafchamps, 2004. "The Resources and Governance of Non-Governmental Organizations in Uganda," Economics Series Working Papers, University of Oxford, Department of Economics WPS/2004-06, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Öhler, Hannes, 2013. "Do Aid Donors Coordinate Within Recipient Countries?," Working Papers, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics 539, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
  5. Burger, Ronelle & Owens, Trudy, 2010. "Promoting Transparency in the NGO Sector: Examining the Availability and Reliability of Self-Reported Data," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 1263-1277, September.
  6. Peter Nunnenkamp & Janina Weingarth & Johannes Weisser, 2008. "Is NGO Aid Not So Different After All? Comparing the Allocation of Swiss Aid by Private and Official Donors," Kiel Working Papers, Kiel Institute for the World Economy 1405, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  7. Paul Mosley, 2013. "Two Africas? Why Africa’s ‘Growth Miracle’ is barely reducing poverty," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series, BWPI, The University of Manchester 19113, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

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