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The Effect of Ethnic Violence on an Export-Oriented Industry

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  • Ksoll, Christopher
  • Macchiavello, Rocco
  • Morjaria, Ameet

Abstract

This paper investigates the effects of ethnic violence on export-oriented firms and their workers. Following the disputed 2007 Kenyan presidential election, export volumes of flower firms affected by the ensuing violence dropped by 38 percent and worker absence exceeded 50 percent. Large firms and firms with stable contractual relationships in export markets registered smaller proportional losses and had fewer workers absent. Model calibrations indicate that, to induce workers to come and work over-time, operating costs, on average, increased by 16 percent. For the marginal worker, the cost of going to work exceeded the average weekly income by 320 percent.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 8074.

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Date of creation: Oct 2010
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8074

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Related research

Keywords: ethnic Violence; exports; firm heterogeneity; non-traditional agriculture;

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References

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  1. Philippe Martin & Thierry Mayer & Mathias Thoenig, 2008. "Civil Wars and International Trade," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/10149, Sciences Po.
  2. Dupas, Pascaline & Robinson, Jonathan, 2012. "The (hidden) costs of political instability: Evidence from Kenya's 2007 election crisis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 314-329.
  3. Collier, Paul & Hoeffler, Anke, 1998. "On Economic Causes of Civil War," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(4), pages 563-73, October.
  4. Alesina, Alberto, et al, 1996. " Political Instability and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 189-211, June.
  5. Oeindrila Dube & Juan F. Vargas, 2013. "Commodity Price Shocks and Civil Conflict: Evidence from Colombia," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(4), pages 1384-1421.
  6. Timothy Besley & Hannes Mueller, 2009. "Estimating the peace dividend: the impact of violence on house prices in Northern Ireland," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25427, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  7. Massimo Guidolin & Eliana La Ferrara, 2007. "Diamonds Are Forever, Wars Are Not: Is Conflict Bad for Private Firms?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(5), pages 1978-1993, December.
  8. Roubini, Nouriel & Swagel, Phillip & Ozler, Sule & Alesina, Alberto, 1996. "Political Instability and Economic Growth," Scholarly Articles 4553024, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  9. Richard Akresh & Damien de Walque, 2008. "Armed Conflict and Schooling: Evidence from the 1994 Rwandan Genocide," HiCN Working Papers 47, Households in Conflict Network.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Jonas Hjort, 2013. "Ethnic Divisions and Production in Firms," CESifo Working Paper Series 4449, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Klapper, Leora & Richmond, Christine & Tran, Trang, 2013. "Civil conflict and firm performance : evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6640, The World Bank.
  3. Massimiliano Cali & Sami Miaari, 2013. "The labour market impact of mobility restrictions: Evidence from the West Bank," ERSA conference papers ersa13p99, European Regional Science Association.
  4. Carly Petracco & Helena Schweiger, 2012. "The impact of armed conflict on firms’ performance and perceptions," Working Papers 152, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Office of the Chief Economist.
  5. Muhammad, Andrew & D'Souza, Anna & Amponsah, William A., 2011. "Violence, Political Instability, and International Trade: Evidence from Kenya’s Cut Flower Sector," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 118374, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  6. Muhammad, Andrew & D’Souza, Anna & Amponsah, William, 2013. "Violence, Instability, and Trade: Evidence from Kenya’s Cut Flower Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 20-31.
  7. Macchiavello, Rocco & Morjaria, Ameet, 2013. "The Value of Relationships: Evidence from a Supply Shock to Kenyan Rose Exports," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1032, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.

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