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Monetary and Fiscal Policy Coordination when Bonds Provide Transactions Services

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  • Canzoneri, Matthew B
  • Cumby, Robert
  • Diba, Behzad
  • López-Salido, J David

Abstract

It is commonly asserted that monetary and fiscal policy may have to be coordinated if they are to provide a nominal anchor and avoid the pathological outcomes of sunspots or explosive price paths. In this paper, we study a model in which government bonds are an imperfect substitute for money in the transactions technology, providing a new channel for debt dynamics to feed into inflation dynamics. This modification of an otherwise standard NNS model substantially alters the conditions for local determinacy and the requirements for macroeconomic policy coordination: the Taylor Principle is no longer sacrosanct; a weak fiscal response to debt is no longer the panacea for a weak monetary policy; sunspot equilibria may be less relevant than previously thought; and the need for coordination may be less than previously thought. In addition, our model provides a new way of thinking about the structural break that is thought to have occurred around 1980 in monetary policy and in the dynamics of government spending and private consumption.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 6814.

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Date of creation: May 2008
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6814

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Keywords: Bonds; Monetary and Fiscal Policies; Transaction Services;

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References

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  1. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martin Uribe, 2001. "Optimal Fiscal and Monetary Policy Under Sticky Prices," Departmental Working Papers 200105, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
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  11. Canzoneri, Matthew B & Cumby, Robert & Diba, Behzad & López-Salido, J David, 2008. "Monetary Aggregates and Liquidity in a Neo-Wicksellian Framework," CEPR Discussion Papers 6813, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  13. Canzoneri, Matthew B. & Diba, Behzad T., 2005. "Interest rate rules and price determinacy: The role of transactions services of bonds," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 329-343, March.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Canzoneri, Matthew B & Cumby, Robert & Diba, Behzad & López-Salido, J David, 2008. "Monetary Aggregates and Liquidity in a Neo-Wicksellian Framework," CEPR Discussion Papers 6813, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Tatiana Kirsanova & Simon Wren‐Lewis, 2012. "Optimal Fiscal Feedback on Debt in an Economy with Nominal Rigidities," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(559), pages 238-264, 03.
  3. Stähler, Nikolai & Thomas, Carlos, 2011. "FiMod - a DSGE model for fiscal policy simulations," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,06, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  4. Marzo, Massimiliano & Zagaglia, Paolo, 2008. "Determinacy of Interest Rate Rules with Bond Transaction Services in a Cashless Economy," Research Papers in Economics 2008:7, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.

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