Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Psychological Traits and Trading Strategies

Contents:

Author Info

  • Biais, Bruno
  • Hilton, Denis
  • Pouget, Sébastien

Abstract

In this Paper we measure psychological traits and show that they significantly affect behaviour and performance in a financial context. Based on the answers of 184 subjects to a psychological questionnaire we measured their degree of overconfidence, ie. the extent to which they overestimate the precision of their information, and self-monitoring, which is a form of social intelligence. The subjects also participated in an experimental financial market under asymmetric information in the spirit of Plott and Sunder (1988). In line with the hypothesis that they suffer from the winner’s curse, overconfident subjects are found to earn relatively low trading profits. In contrast, our finding that high self-monitors earn relatively large trading profits is consistent with the hypothesis that they are relatively good at anticipating the trading motivations of the other traders.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP3195.asp
Download Restriction: CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 3195.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Feb 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3195

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Centre for Economic Policy Research, 77 Bastwick Street, London EC1V 3PZ.
Phone: 44 - 20 - 7183 8801
Fax: 44 - 20 - 7183 8820

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: self-monitors; social intelligence; trading strategies;

Other versions of this item:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Reinhard Selten & Michael Mitzkewitz & Gerald R. Uhlich, 1997. "Duopoly Strategies Programmed by Experienced Players," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 517-556, May.
  2. Anderson, M.J. & Sunder, S., 1995. "Professional Traders as Intuitive Bayesians," GSIA Working Papers 1995-05, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  3. Biais, Bruno & Pouget, Sébastien, 2000. "Microstructure, Incentives, and the Discovery of Equilibrium in Experimental Financial Markets," IDEI Working Papers 103, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  4. Camerer, Colin, . "Progress and Behavioral Game Theory," Working Papers 1004, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  5. Camerer, Colin & Loewenstein, George & Weber, Martin, 1989. "The Curse of Knowledge in Economic Settings: An Experimental Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1232-54, October.
  6. Joel L. Schrag, 1999. "First Impressions Matter: A Model Of Confirmatory Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 37-82, February.
  7. Klayman, Joshua & Soll, Jack B. & Gonzalez-Vallejo, Claudia & Barlas, Sema, 1999. "Overconfidence: It Depends on How, What, and Whom You Ask, , , , , , , , ," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 216-247, September.
  8. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2000. "Trading Is Hazardous to Your Wealth: The Common Stock Investment Performance of Individual Investors," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 773-806, 04.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Glaser, Markus & Weber, Martin, 2003. "Overconfidence and Trading Volume," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 03-07, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim & Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
  2. Dennis Dittrich & Werner Güth & Boris Maciejovsky, 2001. "Overconfidence in Investment Decisions: An Experimental Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 626, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Patterson, Fernando M. & Daigler, Robert T., 2014. "The abnormal psychology of investment performance," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 55-63.
  4. Locke, Peter R. & Mann, Steven C., 2005. "Professional trader discipline and trade disposition," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 401-444, May.
  5. Glaser, Markus & Weber, Martin, 2003. "Overconfidence and Trading Volume," CEPR Discussion Papers 3941, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Shahzad, Syed jawad hussain & Ali, Paeman & Saleem, Fawad & Ali, Sajid & Akram, Sehrish, 2013. "Stock market efficiency: Behavioral or traditional paradigm?Evidence from Karachi Stock Exchange (KSE) and investors community of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 45095, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Miraldo, M & Galizzi, M & Stavropoulou, C, 2013. "In sickness but not in wealth: Field evidence on patients? risk preferences in the financial and health domain," Working Papers 12579, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3195. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.