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The Mechanics of a Successful Exchange-Rate Peg: Lessons for emerging Markets

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  • Dueker, Michael
  • Fischer, Andreas M

Abstract

This study seeks to determine if there were identifiable contrasts between the Austrian and Thai pegs that would have hinted at problems for Thailand prior to July 1997. The strategy is to first estimate a reaction function of a successful pegging country, i.e. Austria, to help identify salient features that made the Austrian peg credible. Next, the same model is applied to Thailand's monetary policy, an East Asian country that maintained one of the tightest pegs to the US dollar prior to its collapse. One lesson for pegging countries that emerges from the empirical results is that they ought to behave like assiduous inflation targeters even when there is no pressure on the exchange rate. A second lesson is that care is needed in choosing an anchor currency, because the major currencies experience wide swings against one another.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 2829.

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Date of creation: Jun 2001
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2829

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References

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  1. Eduard HOCHREITER & Georg WINCKLER, 1993. "The Advantages of Tying Austria's Hands: The Success of the Hard Currency Strategy," Vienna Economics Papers vie9307, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
  2. Corsetti, G. & Pesenti, P. & Roubini, N., 1998. "What Caused the Asian Currency and Financial Crisis?," Papers 343, Banca Italia - Servizio di Studi.
  3. Michael J. Dueker & Andreas M. Fischer, 1998. "A guide to nominal feedback rules and their use for monetary policy," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 55-63.
  4. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo, 2001. "Fixing for your life," MPRA Paper 13873, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Hausmann, Ricardo & Panizza, Ugo & Stein, Ernesto, 2001. "Why do countries float the way they float?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 387-414, December.
  6. von Hagen, J, 1995. "Inflation and Monetary Targeting in Germany," Papers 03, American Institute for Contemporary German Studies-.
  7. Flood, Robert P & Rose, Andrew K, 1998. "Understanding Exchange Rate Volatility Without the Contrivance of Macroeconomics," CEPR Discussion Papers 1944, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Dueker, Michael & Fischer, Andreas M, 2000. "Austria's Hard-Currency Policy: The Mechanics of Successful Exchange-Rate Peg," CEPR Discussion Papers 2478, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Michael Dueker & Andreas M. Fischer, 1995. "Inflation targeting in a small open economy: empirical results for Switzerland," Working Papers 1995-014, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
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Cited by:
  1. Michael J. Dueker & Andreas M. Fischer, 2006. "Do inflation targeters outperform non-targeters?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 431-450.
  2. Syed Kumail Abbas Rizvi & Bushra Naqvi & Nawazish Mirza, 2013. "Choice of Anchor Currencies and Dynamic Preferences for Exchange Rate Pegging in Asia," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 18(2), pages 37-49, July-Dec.
  3. Andrea Bubula & Inci Ötker, 2003. "Are Pegged and Intermediate Regimes More Crisis Prone?," IMF Working Papers 03/223, International Monetary Fund.

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