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Endemic diseases and agricultural productivity: Challenges and policy response

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  • Martine AUDIBERT

    ()
    (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International)

Abstract

Contrary to Asian countries, the agricultural sector in Africa had not benefited from the green revolution success. After a long time of disinterest in the agriculture sector in Africa, several voices arise now in favour of greater efforts towards this sector. Several studies tend to show the crucial role of agriculture in African countries’ growth and highlight the huge need of increasing the productivity in this sector. If increase in agriculture productivity requires both an expansion of irrigated areas and the adoption of high yield varieties, those innovations and their high development could be the source of negative health (and environmental) effects. Using a mega-analysis, this paper highlights first the links between health, disease and development and then agricultural productivity. The literature review shows that the negative effect of bad health was not systematically checked, and that the intensity of this effect depends of the disease, but also of the work productivity and the existence or not of a coping process. The second part of the paper focused on the development of high intensive agriculture as a risk factor for farmers’ and rural inhabitants’ health. This survey shows that whether irrigation and fertilizer and pest intensive use could be considered as highly health (and environmental) risk factors, appropriate control measures (such as for examples systematic maintenance of irrigation canals, alternate wetting and drying of irrigated fields or integrated pest management) considerably reduce this risk, while at the same time, increase the agriculture productivity.

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File URL: http://publi.cerdi.org/ed/2008/2008.23.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CERDI in its series Working Papers with number 200823.

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Length: 48
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:1035

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Keywords: agriculture; productivity; endemic disease; health risk factor; Africa;

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References

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  1. van der Velde, M. & Green, S.R. & Vanclooster, M. & Clothier, B.E., 2007. "Sustainable development in small island developing states: Agricultural intensification, economic development, and freshwater resources management on the coral atoll of Tongatapu," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2-3), pages 456-468, March.
  2. Brenton, Paul & Hoppe, Mombert, 2006. "The African Growth and Opportunity Act, exports, and development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3996, The World Bank.
  3. Gine, Xavier & Yang, Dean, 2007. "Insurance, credit, and technology adoption : field experimental evidence from Malawi," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4425, The World Bank.
  4. Jean-Pierre Lachaud, 2005. "HIV prevalence and poverty in Africa : micro and macro-econometric evidence applied to Burkina Faso," Documents de travail 113, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
  5. Audibert, Martine & Etard, Jean-Francois, 2003. "Productive Benefits after Investment in Health in Mali," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(3), pages 769-82, April.
  6. Liu, Gordon G. & Dow, William H. & Fu, Alex Z. & Akin, John & Lance, Peter, 2008. "Income productivity in China: On the role of health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 27-44, January.
  7. Christiaensen, Luc & Hoffmann, Vivian & Sarris, Alexander, 2007. "Gauging the welfare effects of shocks in rural Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4406, The World Bank.
  8. Christiaensen, Luc & Demery, Lionel & Kuhl, Jesper, 2006. "The role of agriculture in poverty reduction an empirical perspective," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4013, The World Bank.
  9. Bell, Clive & Bruhns, Ramona & Gersbach, Hans, 2006. "Economic growth, education, and AIDS in Kenya : a long-run analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4025, The World Bank.
  10. Audibert, Martine & Mathonnat, Jacky & Henry, Marie-Claire, 2003. "Social and health determinants of the efficiency of cotton farmers in Northern Côte d'Ivoire," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 1705-1717, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Martine Audibert & Pascale Combes Motel & Alassane Drabo, 2012. "Global burden of disease and economic growth," Working Papers halshs-00678713, HAL.
  2. Martine Audibert & Pascale Combes Motel & Alassane Drabo, 2013. "Health capital depreciation effects on development: theory and measurement," Working Papers halshs-00832877, HAL.

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