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Local Neighbourhood and Mental Health: Evidence from the UK

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Author Info

  • Carol Propper
  • Kelvyn Jones
  • Anne Bolster
  • Simon Burgess
  • Ron Johnston
  • Rebecca Sarker

    ()

Abstract

Using a very local definition of neighbourhood, and characterising that neighbourhood along five relatively orthogonal dimensions based on the socio-economic characteristics of the population of the neighbourhood, this paper examines the association between neighbourhood and levels and changes in mental health. We find that the extent of association between neighbourhood and both levels and changes in mental health is limited. While there are some individuals whose mental health is statistically associated with their neighbourhood composition, the importance of these differences is not large. What appears to be important for levels of mental health are the characteristics of individuals and their households, not place. Changes in mental health are not even associated with the characteristics that predict levels of health.

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File URL: http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/CMPO/workingpapers/wp99.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series The Centre for Market and Public Organisation with number 04/099.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:04/099

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Keywords: mental health; neighbourhood; multilevel modelling;

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References

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  1. Silver, Eric & Mulvey, Edward P. & Swanson, Jeffrey W., 2002. "Neighborhood structural characteristics and mental disorder: Faris and Dunham revisited," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1457-1470, October.
  2. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2001. "Well-Being Over Time in Britain and the USA," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 616, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  3. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-59, May.
  4. Katharina Hauck & Nigel Rice, 2004. "A longitudinal analysis of mental health mobility in Britain," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 981-1001.
  5. Andrew McCulloch, 2001. "Ward-level deprivation and individual social and economic outcomes in the British Household Panel Study," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 33(4), pages 667-684, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Gardner, Jonathan & Oswald, Andrew J., 2007. "Money and mental wellbeing: A longitudinal study of medium-sized lottery wins," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 49-60, January.
  2. Denis Gerstorf & Nilam Ram & Jan Goebel & Jürgen Schupp & Ulman Lindenberger & Gert G. Wagner, 2010. "Where People Live and Die Makes a Difference: Individual and Geographic Disparities in Well-Being Progression at the End of Life," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 287, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  3. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald & Sarah Stewart-Brown, 2012. "Is Psychological Well-being Linked to the Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables?," NBER Working Papers 18469, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00590404 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00590307 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Dylan Kneale & Ruth Lupton, 2010. "Are there neighbourhood effects on teenage parenthood in the UK, and does it matter for policy? A review of theory and evidence," CASE Papers case141, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
  7. Gundi Knies & C. Katharina Spieß, 2007. "Regional Data in the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP)," Data Documentation 17, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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