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Reducing Automobile Dependency on Campus: Evaluating the Impact TDM Using Stated Preferences

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  • Barla, Philippe
  • Lapierre, Nathanael
  • Alvarez Daziano, Ricardo
  • Herrmann, Markus

Abstract

In this paper, we evaluate the potential impacts of travel demand management strategies to reduce the commuting mode share of automobiles using stated preference data. The analysis is carried out on members of Université Laval in Quebec City (Canada). We measure the impact of travel time and cost as well as attitudes toward automobile, public transit and the environment. We find elasticities with respect to time and cost parameters that are low implying that large changes are required to have a noticeable impact. We find however that combining several policy interventions is more effective. Policies aiming at reducing automobile dependency by changing attitudes do not appear to be particularly effective.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Laval, Center for Research on the Economics of the Environment, Agri-food, Transports and Energy (CREATE) in its series Working Papers with number 121311.

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Date of creation: Feb 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:ulavwp:121311

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Postal: Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation, Pavillon Paul-Comtois, 2425 rue de l'Agriculture, local 4424, Québec, Qc, G1V 0A6
Phone: 418-656-2131 poste 5098
Fax: 418-656-7821
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Web page: http://www.create.ulaval.ca
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Related research

Keywords: Mode choice; stated preferences; travel demand management; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy; R41; R48; Q58;

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  1. Brown, Jeffrey & Hess, Daniel Baldwin & Shoup, Donald, 2003. "Fare-Free Public Transit at Universities: An Evaluation," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3rt6d1hz, University of California Transportation Center.
  2. Axel Börsch-Supan & Moshe Ben-Akiva & Kenneth Train & Daniel McFadden, 2002. "Hybrid Choice Models: Progress and Challenges," MEA discussion paper series 02009, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  3. Vredin Johansson, Maria & Heldt, Tobias & Johansson, Per, 2006. "The effects of attitudes and personality traits on mode choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 507-525, July.
  4. Bilbao Ubillos, J. & Fernández Sainz, A., 2004. "The influence of quality and price on the demand for urban transport: the case of university students," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 607-614, October.
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