Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

An Experimental Investigation of the Impact of Fat Taxes: Prices Effects, Food Stigma, and Information Effects on Economics Instruments to Improve Dietary Health

Contents:

Author Info

  • Cash, Sean B.
  • Lacanilao, Ryan D.
  • Adamowicz, Wiktor L.
  • Raine, Kim

Abstract

There is currently no published research on how food taxes may affect consumer behaviour when the imposition of the tax itself may be considered a source of consumer information. The work undertaken here seeks to address this gap in the literature by using experimental methods to enhance understanding on the joint effects of price changes induced by a fat tax and the stigma associated with the application of the tax. First, we conduct an interdisciplinary literature review (drawing from economics, psychology, and health promotion) and theoretical investigation of the impact of stigma on economic choice behaviours. We then employ Attribute-Based Stated Choice Methods (ABSCM) to elicit consumer response to fat tax scenarios that rely only on price changes, and to those that involve both price changes and stigma effects. The study is still ongoing, and will use a computer-assisted field data collection approach to collect data from participants at grocery stores and/or other food purchase venues. Econometric analysis of the resulting data will allow us to investigate the price response, stigma effect, and price-stigma interaction elicited by various taxation and labelling schemes. Preliminary results from pre-test samples are discussed here.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/45499
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology in its series Consumer and Market Demand Network Papers with number 45499.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Jul 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:ualbnp:45499

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 515 General Services Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AlbertaT6G 2H1
Phone: (780) 492-4225
Fax: (780) 492-0268
Email:
Web page: http://www.rees.ualberta.ca/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: obesity; health policy; fat taxes; warning labels; choice experiments; Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy; Consumer/Household Economics; Demand and Price Analysis; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; I18; Q18;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Schroeter, Christiane & Lusk, Jayson & Tyner, Wallace, 2008. "Determining the impact of food price and income changes on body weight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 45-68, January.
  2. Jakus, Paul M & Shaw, W Douglass, 2003. " Perceived Hazard and Product Choice: An Application to Recreational Site Choice," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 77-92, January.
  3. Cash, Sean B. & Sunding, David L. & Zilberman, David, 2004. "Fat Taxes And Thin Subsidies: Prices, Diet, And Health Outcomes," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19961, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  4. Smed, Sinne & Jensen, Jorgen Dejgaard & Denver, Sigrid, 2005. "Differentiated Food Taxes as a Tool in Health and Nutrition Policy," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24579, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  5. Kuchler, Fred & Tegene, Abebayehu & Harris, James Michael, 2004. "Taxing Snack Foods: What to Expect for Diet and Tax Revenues," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33607, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  6. Jay Shimshack, 2004. "Are Mercury Advisories Effective? Inofrmation, Education, and Fish Consumption," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0423, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  7. Boizot-Szantai, Christine & Etile, Fabrice, 2005. "The Food Prices / Body Mass Index Relationship: Theory and Evidence from a Sample of French Adults," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24734, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  8. Shimshack, Jay P. & Ward, Michael B. & Beatty, Timothy K.M., 2007. "Mercury advisories: Information, education, and fish consumption," MPRA Paper 25995, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Arianto A. Patunru & John B. Braden & Sudip Chattopadhyay, 2007. "Who Cares about Environmental Stigmas and Does It Matter? A Latent Segmentation Analysis of Stated Preferences for Real Estate," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(3), pages 712-726.
  10. Jayson Lusk & T Schroeder, 2004. "Are choice experiments incentive compatible? A test with quality differentiated beef steaks," Artefactual Field Experiments 00096, The Field Experiments Website.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:ualbnp:45499. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.