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What is the Scope for Increased Fertilizer Use in Kenya?

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  • Sheahan, Megan
  • Black, Roy
  • Jayne, Thomas S.

Abstract

Despite upward trends in fertilizer application rates on maize fields over the last twenty years, there remains a perception in Kenya that fertilizer use is not expanding quickly enough and that application rates are not high enough to reverse the country’s growing national food deficit. In 2007, this manifested in the creation of a comprehensive multi-million dollar fertilizer and improved seed subsidy and training program, the National Accelerated Agricultural Inputs Access Program (NAAIAP), with the objective of raising food production and farm productivity. However, little nationwide and longer term evidence exists to determine whether higher fertilizer application rates are profitable for farmers and whether they would have an incentive to continue using it on commercial terms after graduating from the subsidy program.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security International Development Working Papers with number 135283.

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Date of creation: Jul 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:135283

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Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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Keywords: Kenya; Fertilizer; Food Security; Agricultural and Food Policy; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Security and Poverty; International Development; Production Economics; Productivity Analysis;

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References

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  3. Zhiying Xu & Zhengfei Guan & T.S. Jayne & Roy Black, 2009. "Factors influencing the profitability of fertilizer use on maize in Zambia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(4), pages 437-446, 07.
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  16. Bellemare, Marc F. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2005. "An Ordered Tobit Model of Market Participation: Evidence from Kenya and Ethiopia," Working Papers 14748, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
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