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Fertilizer subsidies in Africa: Are vouchers the answer?

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Author Info

  • Minot, Nicholas
  • Benson, Todd

Abstract

"In the 1970s and 1980s, most African countries sold fertilizer at subsidized prices through state-owned enterprises. In response to the fiscal cost and ineffective implementation of these subsidies, as well as pressure from international financial institutions, almost all of these countries liberalized their fertilizer markets to some degree as part of structural adjustment programs carried out in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Under these reforms, governments eliminated state monopolies on fertilizer distribution and phased out universal subsidies." from text

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series Issue briefs with number 60.

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Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fpr:issbrf:60

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Keywords: Fertilizers; subsidies;

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Cited by:
  1. Sheahan, Megan & Black, Roy & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Are Farmers Under-Utilizing Fertilizer? Evidence from Kenya," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126739, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Minten, Bart & Koro, Bethlehem & Stifel, David, 2013. "The last mile(s) in modern input distribution: Evidence from Northwestern Ethiopia," ESSP working papers 51, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2010. "Old problems in the new solutions?," IFPRI discussion papers 1002, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Mathilde Douillet, 2012. "Trade policies and agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa: Comparative analysis in a Computable General Equilibrium framework," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/45eb019724s, Sciences Po.
  5. Chibwana, Christopher & Fisher, Monica & Shively, Gerald, 2012. "Cropland Allocation Effects of Agricultural Input Subsidies in Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 124-133.
  6. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Old Problems in the New Solutions? Politically Motivated Allocation of Program Benefits and the "New" Fertilizer Subsidies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1166-1176, July.
  7. Krausova, Marika & Banful, Afua Branoah, 2010. "Overview of the agricultural input sector in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 1024, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Douillet, Mathilde, 2012. "Trade and agricultural policies in Malawi: Not all policy reform is equally good for the poor," MPRA Paper 40948, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/45eb019724sn6sg9melpggksl is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Chirwa, Themba G., 2010. "Program evaluation of agricultural input subsidies in Malawi using treatment effects: Methods and practicability based on propensity scores," MPRA Paper 20878, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Sheahan, Megan & Black, Roy & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "What is the Scope for Increased Fertilizer Use in Kenya?," Food Security International Development Working Papers 135283, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  12. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda, 2012. "Did using input vouchers improve the distribution of subsidized fertilizer in Nigeria?: The case of Kano and Taraba states," IFPRI discussion papers 1231, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  13. Vondolia, Godwin K., 2011. "Nudging Boserup? The impact of fertilizer subsidies on investment in soil and water conservation," Working Papers in Economics 509, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  14. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda, 2012. "Targeted Subsidies and Private Market Participation: An Assessment of Fertilizer Demand in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1194, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  15. Resnick, Danielle & Tarp, Finn & Thurlow, James, 2012. "The Political Economy of Green Growth: Illustrations from Southern Africa," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  16. Tschirley, David & Theriault, Veronique, 2013. "On the Institutional Details that Mediate the Impact of Cash Crops on Food Crop Intensification: The Case of Cotton," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151263, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  17. Seck, Papa A. & Tollens, Eric & Wopereis, Marco C.S. & Diagne, Aliou & Bamba, Ibrahim, 2010. "Rising trends and variability of rice prices: Threats and opportunities for sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 403-411, October.
  18. Caria, A. Stefano & Tamru, Seneshaw & Bizuneh, Gera, 2011. "Food security without food transfers?: A CGE analysis for Ethiopia of the different food security impacts of fertilizer subsidies and locally sourced food transfers," IFPRI discussion papers 1106, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  19. Msuya, E. E & Isinika, A. C., 2011. "Addressing food self-sufficiency in Tanzania: a balancing act of policy coordination," MPRA Paper 30886, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  20. Smale, Melinda & Birol, Ekin, 2013. "Smallholder demand for maize hybrids and selective seed subsidies in Zambia," HarvestPlus Working Papers 9, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  21. Durevall, Dick & Mussa, Richard, 2010. "Employment diagnostic analysis : Malawi," ILO Working Papers 461444, International Labour Organization.
  22. Kuhn, Arnim & Gaiser, Thomas & Gandonou, Esaïe, 2010. "Simulating the effects of tax exemptions on fertiliser use in Benin by linking biophysical and economic models," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 103(8), pages 509-520, October.
  23. World Bank, 2011. "Tackling Poverty in Northern Ghana," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2755, The World Bank.
  24. Banful, Afua B. & Nkonya, Ephraim & Oboh, Victor, 2010. "Constraints to fertilizer use in Nigeria," IFPRI discussion papers 1010, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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