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Does Household Headship Affect Demand for Hybrid Maize Seed in Kenya? An Exploratory Analysis Based on 2010 Survey Data

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  • Smale, Melinda

Abstract

Women are central to food production and maize is a dominant food staple in Sub-Saharan Africa, but published gender analyses of hybrid seed use in Sub-Saharan Africa are uncommon. Building on previous work, this paper tests the effects of headship definitions on hybrid seed use and explores the variation between male- and female-headed households and among female-headed households in Kenya. Analysis is based on survey data collected by Tegemeo Institute of Egerton College during the 2009-10 cropping season.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/118475
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security International Development Working Papers with number 118475.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:118475

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Keywords: maize; seed; Kenya; household headship; Agricultural and Food Policy; Consumer/Household Economics; Crop Production/Industries; Food Security and Poverty;

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  1. Wekesa, E. & Mwangi, Wilfred & Verkuijl, Hugo & Danda, Milton Kengo & De Groote, Hugo, 2003. "Adoption of Maize Production Technologies in the Coastal Lowlands of Kenya," Miscellaneous Reports 56109, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
  2. Kumar, Shubh K., 1994. "Adoption of hybrid maize in Zambia: effects on gender roles, food consumption, and nutrition," Research reports 100, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Quisumbing, Agnes & Pandolfelli, Lauren, 2008. "Promising approaches to address the needs of poor female farmers:," Research briefs 13, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Ayal Kimhi, 2006. "Plot size and maize productivity in Zambia: is there an inverse relationship?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(1), pages 1-9, 07.
  5. Smale, Melinda & Byerlee, Derek & Jayne, Thom, 2011. "Maize revolutions in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5659, The World Bank.
  6. Chamberlin, Jordan & Jayne, Thomas S., 2009. "Has Kenyan Farmers’ Access to Markets and Services Improved? Panel Survey Evidence, 1997-2007," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 58545, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  7. Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations?: The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 27-39, June.
  8. Smale, Melinda & Heisey, Paul W., 1994. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 10(1), pages 95-99, January.
  9. Doss, Cheryl R., 1999. "Twenty-Five Years Of Research On Women Farmers In Africa: Lessons And Implications For Agricultural Research Institutions; With An Annotated Bibliography," Economics Program Papers 23720, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
  10. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 1996. "Male-female differences in agricultural productivity: Methodological issues and empirical evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(10), pages 1579-1595, October.
  11. Jacob Ricker-Gilbert & Thomas S. Jayne & Ephraim Chirwa, 2010. "Subsidies and Crowding Out: A Double-Hurdle Model of Fertilizer Demand in Malawi," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(1), pages 26-42.
  12. Gladwin, Christina H., 1992. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 7(2), pages 141-153, July.
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