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Adoption of hybrid maize in Zambia: effects on gender roles, food consumption, and nutrition

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  • Kumar, Shubh K.
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    Abstract

    In this report, Shubh K. Kumar examines the reasons for low productivity of maize, the principal crop in Eastern Province, Zambia, compared with its potential, and suggests steps for increasing future productivity. The report also looks at the effects of adoption of hybrid maize on household consumption, nutrition, health, income, and labor and on how these may be redistributed within the household as a result of adoption. In particular, it focuses on changes in women's roles in crop management and resulting changes in allocation of time and money. The report is based on a collaborative study in Eastern Province conducted in 1986 by the International Food Policy Research Institute with the University of Zambia's Rural Development Studies Bureau and the Zambian National Food and Nutrition Commission to examine the growth and equity effects of technological change.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series Research reports with number 100.

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    Date of creation: 1994
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    Handle: RePEc:fpr:resrep:100

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    Related research

    Keywords: Maize industry Zambia Eastern Province.; Corn industry Zambia Eastern Province.; Food consumption Zambia Eastern Province.; Nutrition Zambia Eastern Province.; Women agricultural laborers Zambia Eastern Province.; Sex role in the work environment Zambia Eastern Province.; Gender; Health and nutrition; Agricultural technology; Agricultural growth;

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    Cited by:
    1. Fafchamps, Marcel, 1998. "Efficiency in intrahousehold resource allocation," FCND discussion papers 55, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Weeratunge, N. & Chiuta, T.M. & Choudhury, A. & Ferrer, A. & Hüsken, S.M.C. & Kura, Y. & Kusakabe, K. & Madzudzo, E. & Maetala, R. & Naved, R. & Schwarz, A. & Kantor, P., 2012. "Transforming aquatic agricultural systems towards gender equality: a five country review," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 39966.
    3. Croppenstedt, Andre & Goldstein, Markus & Rosas, Nina, 2013. "Gender and agriculture : inefficiencies, segregation, and low productivity traps," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6370, The World Bank.
    4. Smale, Melinda, 2011. "Does Household Headship Affect Demand for Hybrid Maize Seed in Kenya? An Exploratory Analysis Based on 2010 Survey Data," Food Security International Development Working Papers 118475, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Tanellari, Eftila & Kostandini, Genti & Bonabana, Jackline, 2013. "Gender Impacts on Adoption of New Technologies: Evidence from Uganda," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 143204, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. Kosarek, Jennifer L. & Garcia, Philip & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "Factors explaining the diffusion of hybrid maize in Latin America and the Caribbean region," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 267-280, December.
    7. Haddad, Lawrence & Bhattarai, Saroj & Immink, Maarten & Kumar, Shubh, 1998. "Estimating the interactions between household food security and preschool diarrhea," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3-4), pages 241-261, November.
    8. Zeller, Manfred & Diagne, Aliou & Mataya, Charles, 1998. "Market access by smallholder farmers in Malawi: implications for technology adoption, agricultural productivity and crop income," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 219-229, September.
    9. Ouma, James Okuro & De Groote, Hugo & Owuor, George, 2006. "Determinants of Improved Maize Seed and Fertilizer Use in Kenya: Policy Implications," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25433, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Morris, Michael L. & Doss, Cheryl R., 1999. "How Does Gender Affect The Adoption Of Agricultural Innovations? The Case Of Improved Maize Technology In Ghana," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21609, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Smale, Melinda & Mason, Nicole M., 2013. "Hybrid Seed, Income, and Inequality among Smallholder Maize Farmers in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 146929, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    12. Smale, Melinda & Moursi, Mourad & Birol, Ekin & De Groote, Hugo, 2013. "Hybrid seed use and diversity of diets among women in smallholder maize: Growing households in Zambia," HarvestPlus Working Papers 12, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Hamazakaza, Petan & Smale, Melinda & Kasalu, Helen, 2013. "The Impact of Hybrid Maize on Smallholder Livelihoods in Zambia:Findings of a Household Survey in Katete, Mkushi, and Sinazongwe Districts," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 148808, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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