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How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations?: The case of improved maize technology in Ghana

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  • Doss, Cheryl R.
  • Morris, Michael L.

Abstract

Why do men and women adopt agricultural technologies at different rates? Evidence from Ghana suggests that gender-linked differences in the adoption of modern maize varieties and chemical fertilizer are not attributable to inherent characteristics of the technologies themselves but instead result from gender-linked differences in access to key inputs.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T3V-43439YB-8/2/0b657803739be3c415a72a4286f78f2c
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Blackwell in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2001)
Issue (Month): 1 (June)
Pages: 27-39

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Handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:25:y:2001:i:1:p:27-39

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Web page: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/agec

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  1. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
  2. Doss, Cheryl R., 1999. "Twenty-Five Years Of Research On Women Farmers In Africa: Lessons And Implications For Agricultural Research Institutions; With An Annotated Bibliography," Economics Program Papers 23720, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
  3. Morris, Michael L. & Tripp, Robert & Dankyi, A.A., 1999. "Adoption and Impacts of Improved Maize Production Technology: A Case Study of the Ghana Grains Development Project," Economics Program Papers 48767, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
  4. Doss, Cheryl R., 2002. "Men's Crops? Women's Crops? The Gender Patterns of Cropping in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1987-2000, November.
  5. Rogers, Beatrice Lorge, 1995. "Alternative definitions of female headship in the Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(12), pages 2033-2039, December.
  6. Udry, Christopher, 1996. "Gender, Agricultural Production, and the Theory of the Household," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(5), pages 1010-46, October.
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