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Twenty-Five Years Of Research On Women Farmers In Africa: Lessons And Implications For Agricultural Research Institutions; With An Annotated Bibliography

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  • Doss, Cheryl R.

Abstract

Based on an extensive review of the literature on women farmers in Africa, this paper explores the potential reasons why women farmers have not adopted improved maize technologies and discusses the implications for agricultural research. Women farmers are often constrained by their lack of access to labor, land, and inputs. In addition, women may prefer different outputs than men. Finally, the dynamics of household decision-making affects technology adoption; roles and responsibilities within the household are often renegotiated when new technologies are adopted, and women may be reluctant to provide labor if they do not receive some of the benefits. Each section of this paper includes a number of questions that may provide insights into the gender roles and dynamics in a particular community. Three general conclusions can be drawn from the available literature. First, there is enormous complexity and heterogeneity among African households. Second, there is no simple way to summarize gender roles within African households and communities. Third, gender roles and responsibilities are dynamic; in particular, they change with new economic circumstances. An extensive annotated bibliography on gender issues and the adoption of maize technologies in Africa follows the review of studies.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in its series Economics Program Papers with number 23720.

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Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:cimmep:23720

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Related research

Keywords: Farm Management; Labor and Human Capital;

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Cited by:
  1. Smale, Melinda, 2011. "Does Household Headship Affect Demand for Hybrid Maize Seed in Kenya? An Exploratory Analysis Based on 2010 Survey Data," Food Security International Development Working Papers 118475, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Lilja, Nina K. & Bellon, Mauricio R., 2006. "Analysis of Participatory Research Projects in the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center," Impact Studies 56099, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
  3. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Pandolfelli, Lauren, 2009. "Promising approaches to address the needs of poor female farmers: Resources, constraints, and interventions," IFPRI discussion papers 882, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Peterman, Amber & Behrman, Julia & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2010. "A review of empirical evidence on gender differences in nonland agricultural inputs, technology, and services in developing countries," IFPRI discussion papers 975, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Morris, Michael L. & Doss, Cheryl R., 1999. "How Does Gender Affect The Adoption Of Agricultural Innovations? The Case Of Improved Maize Technology In Ghana," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21609, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  6. Pandolfelli, Lauren & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Dohrn, Stephan, 2007. "Gender and collective action: A conceptual framework for analysis," CAPRi working papers 64, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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