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Agricultural Market Performance and Determinants of Fertilizer Use in Ethiopia

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  • Demeke, Mulat
  • Kelly, Valerie A.
  • Jayne, Thomas S.
  • Said, Ali
  • Le Vallee, Jean-Charles
  • Chen, H.

Abstract

This paper examines how the fertilizer sector in general, and farmers’ demand for fertilizer in particular, has evolved since the introduction of fertilizer sector reforms in Ethiopia. There is much debate in the agricultural development literature about whether fertilizer use in Africa is constrained primarily by poor input distribution systems, by farmers’ lack of knowledge concerning the benefits and correct use of fertilizer, or by lack of effective demand because the product is simply not profitable enough. This paper looks at each of these issues in an effort to understand the relative importance of the different constraints and how well current policies are addressing the problems. It attempts to identify additional policy measures needed to sustain expanded use of fertilizer and thus enhance food security in Ethiopia.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security Collaborative Working Papers with number 55599.

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Date of creation: 1998
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Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:55599

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Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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Related research

Keywords: food security; food policy; Ethiopia; fertilizer use; Crop Production/Industries; Marketing; Q18;

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Cited by:
  1. Wanzala, Maria N. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Staatz, John M. & Mugera, Amin W. & Kirimi, Justus & Owuor, Joseph, 2001. "Agricultural Production Incentives: Fertilizer Markets and Insights from Kenya," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55150, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Rashid, Shahidur & Tefera, Nigussie & Minot, Nicholas & Ayele, Gezahegn, 2013. "Fertilizer in Ethiopia: An assessment of policies, value chain, and profitability:," IFPRI discussion papers 1304, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Kelly, Valerie A., 2005. "Farmers' Demand for Fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa," Staff Papers 11612, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. Adenew, Berhanu, 2004. "The Food Security Role of Agriculture in Ethiopia," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 1(1).
  5. Haileslassie, Amare & Priess, Joerg A. & Veldkamp, Edzo & Lesschen, Jan Peter, 2007. "Nutrient flows and balances at the field and farm scale: Exploring effects of land-use strategies and access to resources," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 459-470, May.
  6. Yonas Alem & Mintewab Bezabih & Menale Kassie & Precious Zikhali, 2010. "Does fertilizer use respond to rainfall variability? Panel data evidence from Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 165-175, 03.
  7. Kelly, Valerie & Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Gordon, Ann, 2003. "Expanding access to agricultural inputs in Africa: a review of recent market development experience," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 379-404, August.
  8. Alemu, Zerihun Gudeta, 2005. "Causes Of Instability In Cereal Production In Ethiopia," Working Paper Series 28073, University of the Free State, Department of Agricultural Economics.
  9. Alemu, Zerihun Gudeta & Oosthuizen, L.K. & van Schalkwyk, Herman D., 2003. "The Effect And Persistence Of Major Changes In Economic Policies On The Long-Term Performance (Trend) Of Ethiopian Agriculture," 2003 Annual Conference, October 2-3, 2003, Pretoria, South Africa 19089, Agricultural Economic Association of South Africa (AEASA).
  10. Yanggen, David & Kelly, Valerie A. & Reardon, Thomas & Naseem, Anwar, 1998. "Incentives for Fertilizer Use in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review of Empirical Evidence on Fertilizer Response and Profitability," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54677, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  11. Spielman, David J. & Kelemwork, Dawit & Alemu, Dawit, 2011. "Seed, fertilizer, and agricultural extension in Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 20, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  12. Larson, Donald F. & Gurara, Daniel Zerfu, 2013. "A conceptual model of incomplete markets and the consequences for technology adoption policies in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6681, The World Bank.

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