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Regional Poverty In Michigan: Rural And Urban Difference

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  • Nizalov, Denys
  • Schmid, A. Allan

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between the quality of local labor force and variation in regional poverty outcomes among Michigan areas. A regional poverty model is derived from the household production model for that purpose. The US Census 2000 data on small geographical areas of Michigan (Census Block Groups) is used for the analysis. It is found that the difference in regional poverty is explained primarily by differences in quality and quantity of labor available to a household. Second, heterogeneity of the model is detected with respect to a degree of urbanization. Also, the relation between average income and regional poverty is found to be nonlinear and distribution of income playing a major role in explanation poverty. Higher poverty rates in rural areas tend to persist over time.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11782
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Staff Papers with number 11782.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11782

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Postal: Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
Phone: (517) 355-4563
Fax: (517) 432-1800
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Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development;

References

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  1. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan & Eldar Shafir, 2004. "A Behavioral-Economics View of Poverty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 419-423, May.
  2. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Lawrence F. Katz, 1992. "Regional Evolutions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(1), pages 1-76.
  3. Jonathan Morduch, 1999. "The Microfinance Promise," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1569-1614, December.
  4. Strauss, J. & Thomas, D., 1995. "Health, Nutrition and Economic development," Papers 95-23, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  5. Dan Rickman, 1998. "The causes of regional variation in U.S. poverty: A cross-county analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa98p13, European Regional Science Association.
  6. Jill L. Findeis & Leif Jensen, 1998. "Employment Opportunities in Rural Areas: Implications for Poverty in a Changing Policy Environment," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(5), pages 1000-1007.
  7. Jyotsna Jalan & Martin Ravallion, 1998. "Geographic Poverty Traps?," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development 86, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
  8. Timothy J. Bartik, 2001. "Jobs for the Poor: Can Labor Demand Policies Help?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number tjb2001.
  9. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
  10. Robert K. Triest, 1997. "Regional differences in family poverty," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jan, pages 3-17.
  11. Steven Raphael & Lorien Rice, 2000. "Car Ownership, Employment, and Earnings," JCPR Working Papers 179, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  12. Schultz, T. Paul, 1988. "Education investments and returns," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 13, pages 543-630 Elsevier.
  13. Ravallion, Martin & Datt, Gaurav, 2002. "Why has economic growth been more pro-poor in some states of India than others?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 381-400, August.
  14. Forni, Mario & Lippi, Marco, 1997. "Aggregation and the Microfoundations of Dynamic Macroeconomics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198288008, Octomber.
  15. Forni, Mario & Lippi, Marco, 1999. "Aggregation of linear dynamic microeconomic models," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 131-158, February.
  16. Lipton, Michael & Ravallion, Martin, 1993. "Poverty and policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1130, The World Bank.
  17. Elizabeth T. Powers & Max Dupuy, 1994. "Understanding differences in regional poverty rates," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Nov.
  18. Nizalov, Denys, 2003. "A Quantitative Assessment Of Factors Contributing To The Economic Growth Of Michigan Regions," Graduate Research Masters Degree Plan B Papers 10995, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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