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Determinants Of Fertilizer Adoption By African Farmers: Policy Analysis Framework, Illustrative Evidence, And Implications

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Author Info

  • Reardon, Thomas
  • Kelly, Valerie A.
  • Yanggen, David
  • Crawford, Eric W.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11779
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Staff Papers with number 11779.

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Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11779

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
Phone: (517) 355-4563
Fax: (517) 432-1800
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Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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Related research

Keywords: Crop Production/Industries;

References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Clay, Daniel C. & Byiringiro, Fidele Usabuwera & Kangasniemi, Jaakko & Reardon, Thomas & Sibomana, Bosco & Uwamariya, Laurence & Tardif-Douglin, David, 1995. "Promoting Food Security in Rwanda Through Sustainable Agricultural Productivity: Meeting the Challenges of Population Pressure, Land Degradation, and Poverty," Food Security International Development Papers 54054, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Kelly, Valerie A. & Reardon, Thomas & Yanggen, David & Naseem, Anwar, 1998. "Fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa: Breaking the Vicious Circle of High Prices and Low Demand," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11449, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  3. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Baidu-Forson, Jojo, 1995. "Farmers' perceptions and adoption of new agricultural technology: evidence from analysis in Burkina Faso and Guinea, West Africa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 1-9, October.
  4. Takeshi Sakurai & Thomas Reardon, 1997. "Potential Demand for Drought Insurance in Burkina Faso and Its Determinants," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1193-1207.
  5. Clay, Daniel & Reardon, Thomas & Kangasniemi, Jaakko, 1998. "Sustainable Intensification in the Highland Tropics: Rwandan Farmers' Investments in Land Conservation and Soil Fertility," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(2), pages 351-77, January.
  6. Matlon, Peter J., 1990. "Improving Productivity in Sorghum and Pearl Millet in Semi-Arid Africa," Food Research Institute Studies, Stanford University, Food Research Institute, issue 01.
  7. Rusike, Joseph & Reardon, Thomas & Howard, Julie A. & Kelly, Valerie A., 1998. "Developing Cereal-Based Demand for Fertilizer among Smallholders in Southern Africa: Lessons Learned and Implications for Other African Regions," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11344, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  8. Ephraim Nkonya & Ted Schroeder & David Norman, 1997. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seed And Fertiliser In Northern Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 1-12.
  9. Naseem, Anwar & Kelly, Valerie A., 1999. "Macro Trends and Determinates of Fertilizer Use in Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54671, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  10. Timmer, C. Peter, 1974. "The Demand for Fertilizer in Developing Countries," Food Research Institute Studies, Stanford University, Food Research Institute, issue 03.
  11. Gladwin, Christina H., 1992. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 7(2), pages 141-153, July.
  12. Weight, David & Kelly, Valerie A., 1998. "Restoring Soil Fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa: Technical and Economic Issues," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11374, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  13. Savadogo, Kimseyinga & Reardon, Thomas & Pietola, Kyosti, 1995. "Mechanization and Agricultural Supply Response in the Sahel: A Farm-Level Profit Function Analysis," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 4(3), pages 336-77, December.
  14. Shiferaw, Bekele & Holden, Stein T., 1998. "Resource degradation and adoption of land conservation technologies in the Ethiopian Highlands: A case study in Andit Tid, North Shewa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 233-247, May.
  15. Rauniyar, Ganesh P. & Goode, Frank M., 1992. "Technology adoption on small farms," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 275-282, February.
  16. Gladwin, Christina H., 1992. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics: The Journal of the International Association of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 7(2), July.
  17. Kelley, Valerie A. & Diagana, Bocar N. & Reardon, Thomas & Gaye, Matar & Crawford, Eric W., 1996. "Cash Crop and Foodgrain Productivity in Senegal: Historical View, New Survey Evidence, and Policy Implications," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11459, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Minot, Nicholas & Kherallah, Mylène & Berry, Philippe, 2000. "Fertilizer market reform and the determinants of fertilizer use in Benin and Malawi," MSSD discussion papers 40, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Wobst, Peter & Tchale, Hardwick & Frohberg, Klaus, 2004. "Soil Fertility Management Choice in the Maize-Based Smallholder Farming System in Malawi," 2004 Inaugural Symposium, December 6-8, 2004, Nairobi, Kenya 9524, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
  3. Kelly, Valerie A., 2005. "Farmers' Demand for Fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa," Staff Papers 11612, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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