Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Seed market liberalization, hybrid maize adoption, and impacts on smallholder farmers in Tanzania

Contents:

Author Info

  • Kathage, Jonas
  • Qaim, Matin
  • Kassie, Menale
  • Shiferaw, Bekele A.

Abstract

Published as Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood Discussion Paper #12. Full text available at http://purl.umn.edu/131756

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126231
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil with number 126231.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126231

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://www.iaae-agecon.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: seed market liberalization; farm survey; technology adoption; household living standards; Tanzania; Agricultural and Food Policy; Consumer/Household Economics; Crop Production/Industries; I31; Q12; Q13; Q16;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Mulubrhan Amare & Solomon Asfaw & Bekele Shiferaw, 2012. "Welfare impacts of maize–pigeonpea intensification in Tanzania," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43(1), pages 27-43, 01.
  2. Smale, Melinda & Jayne, T.S., 2003. "Maize in Eastern and Southern Africa: 'seeds' of success in retrospect," EPTD discussion papers 97, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. George E. Battese, 1997. "A Note On The Estimation Of Cobb-Douglas Production Functions When Some Explanatory Variables Have Zero Values," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 250-252.
  4. Anwar Naseem & David J. Spielman & Steven Were Omamo, 2010. "Private-sector investment in R&D: a review of policy options to promote its growth in developing-country agriculture," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(1), pages 143-173.
  5. Deepthi Elizabeth Kolady & David J. Spielman & Anthony Cavalieri, 2012. "The Impact of Seed Policy Reforms and Intellectual Property Rights on Crop Productivity in India," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(2), pages 361-384, 06.
  6. Paul Winters & Alessandro Maffioli & Lina Salazar, 2011. "Introduction to the Special Feature: Evaluating the Impact of Agricultural Projects in Developing Countries," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(2), pages 393-402, 06.
  7. De Groote, Hugo & Owuor, George & Doss, Cheryl R. & Ouma, James Okuro & Muhammad, Lutta & Danda, Milton Kengo, 2005. "The Maize Green Revolution in Kenya Revisited," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 2(1).
  8. Ira Matuschke & Matin Qaim, 2009. "The impact of social networks on hybrid seed adoption in India," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 493-505, 09.
  9. Jayne, T. S. & Govereh, J. & Mwanaumo, A. & Nyoro, J. K. & Chapoto, A., 2002. "False Promise or False Premise? The Experience of Food and Input Market Reform in Eastern and Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1967-1985, November.
  10. Japhether, W. & De Groote, Hugo & Lawrence, M. & Danda, Milton Kengo & Mohammed, Lutta, 2006. "Recycling Hybrid Maize Varieties: Is It Backward Practice or Innovative Response to Adverse Conditions in Kenya?," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25726, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  11. Ira Matuschke & Matin Qaim, 2008. "Seed Market Privatisation and Farmers' Access to Crop Technologies: The Case of Hybrid Pearl Millet Adoption in India," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(3), pages 498-515, 09.
  12. Kassie, Menale & Shiferaw, Bekele & Muricho, Geoffrey, 2011. "Agricultural Technology, Crop Income, and Poverty Alleviation in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1784-1795.
  13. Esther Duflo & Michael Kremer & Jonathan Robinson, 2008. "How High Are Rates of Return to Fertilizer? Evidence from Field Experiments in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 482-88, May.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Kathage, Jonas & Qaim, Matin & Kassie, Menale & Shiferaw, Bekele A., 2013. "Big Constraints or Small Returns? Explaining Nonadoption of Hybrid Maize in Tanzania," Discussion Papers 144007, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126231. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.